Transcribed from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


William H. Stout, deceased, was born at Troy, Mich., July 14, 1838, and died at Fort Scott, Kan., Jan. 24, 1898. He was the son of Jesse Lee and Olivia (Price) Stout. They moved from New York to Troy, Oakland county, Michigan, in 1831, and located on a farm of 200 acres which is now owned by the Stout family. This piece of property has been held in the family for 100 years. The Stout family figured prominently in the early history of Michigan, as Jesse Stout was a Republican and took an active part in local affairs, and he was a stanch supporter of the Methodist Episcopal church. One of his sons, Hon. Byron G. Stout, represented the Sixth Congressional district of Michigan in Congress and was at one time the Democratic candidate for United States senator and three times the candidate of that party for governor of Michigan. There were three sons in the family: Byron G., William H., and Wilbur F., the latter being the only one now living. William H. Stout entered the University of Michigan after completing his elementary education and graduated with great credit to himself. Alter receiving his degree he engaged in private banking business at Pontiac, Mich. On May 22, 1867, he married Mary E. Fox, who was born in New York City, daughter of Charles James and Ellan (Byron) Fox, the former born in Calcutta, India, son of an English army officer, and the latter in Liverpool, England. They were married in England and several years later came to the United States, locating at New York City, and from there removed to Commerce, Mich. Mrs. Stout's father taught a private school, where young men prepared for college. Subsequently he engaged in business at Pontiac for years. In 1869, Mr. and Mrs. Stout started west. They came by railroad as far as Kansas City and then by stage coach to Fort Scott, arriving in October. Fort Scott was then only a village and Mr. Stout immediately organized a grain and implement business, in partnership with a Mr. Durkee, under the firm name of Durkee & Stout Grain & Implement Company. They also owned and operated large cattle ranches in Kansas and Missouri. Mr. Stout was a natural business man; he owned stock in different banks of Fort Scott and was tendered the presidency of several, which he declined. Over twenty years before his death he retired from active business, but remained president of the grain and implement company. One son, Howard Lee, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Stout. He is now at the head of the many interests organized by his father, and is also president of the Kansas Mutual Life Insurance Company, which he organized. The old Durkee & Stout Company has been reorganized under the name of Fort Scott Grain & Implement Company. Mr. Stout built the beautiful home in Fort Scott, where his widow resides. He was a Republican in politics, a member of the Masonic order, served as mayor of Fort Scott, and at the time of his death was a member of the library board, a position he had held from the time of its organization. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and was always active in religious work. While he was a successful financier, it is not as a business man that he is remembered, but for his generosity and public spirit as he was always liberal in contributions to all improvements of the city. He was a cultured Christian gentleman and one of the pioneers in the business affairs of Southeastern Kansas. Mr. Stout's son, Howard Lee, is a graduate of Yale University. He married Estelle M. Tierman, and two children have been born to them—William H. and Stewart.

Pages 323-324 from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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