Transcribed from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


William Arthur Stacey of Abilene, is one of the most able teachers of the state and is prominent as the superintendent of the public schools of Abilene. Mr. Stacey was born in London, England, Sept. 14, 1864, a son of William and Lucy (Widlock) Stacey, both of whom were born in the village of Freith, near Henley on the Thames, in the county of Buckinghamshire, England. Until 1870 the family resided in London, where William Stacey was for many years a foreman in the then famous manufacturing establishment of John Burgess & Son, in the Strand. At the time of removal to Kansas, in 1870, the family consisted of four persons—William Stacey and his wife Lucy, William Arthur Stacey, and a daughter, Lucy Georgiana Stacey. In the month of May, in the year mentioned, the family arrived in Dickinson county, Kansas, and settled in the north part of the county, in the Chapman creek valley, near the present village of Industry. The country was at that time extremely sparsely settled. The southern cattle trade was then at its height and the prairies were covered with the herds. Agriculture was impossible. After a few years the settlers increased in number sufficiently to dictate the policy of the country, and the cattle trade ceased. Farming then began. The homestead farm of the Stacey family increased in value as adjoining lands were purchased. Privations were severe and hardships incident to life in a new country were common. William Arthur Stacey assisted in the labor on the farm in the summer and attended the district school in the winter. Later, he taught in the district schools and attended high school in Abilene, the county seat of the county. Subsequently, he entered Campbell Normal University at Holton, Kan., and was graduated at that institution with the degree of Bachelor of Science in 1887. He was under agreement to return to the college the following September as an instructor, and thus continued his studies, but a general crop failure so reduced the number of students that his services were unnecessary. He then returned to his work of teaching. In succession he held the position of superintendent of schools at Hope, Morganville, LaCygne, Burlington, and Abilene. He became the head of the city schools of Abilene in January, 1907, and since assuming that position has had charge of the completion of the new high school building, and the present organization has been the result of his thought and effort. Its student body has doubled in number and its course of study is one of the best in the state, its graduates being received in the leading universities of the United States without entrance examination. Professor Stacey has, during his career as an educator, been prominently identified with institute work and is recognized by the profession as one of the able men of his calling in Kansas. He is a member of the Kansas State Teachers' Association and of the Burlington (Kan.) Chapter, Royal Arch Masons. His brothers and sisters are: Lucy Georgiana Stacey, of Abilene; Mrs. Elizabeth (Stacey) Steinbruck, of Manchester; Richard and Albert Stacey, of Dickinson county, and Eugene Stacey, a civil engineer in the service of the Oregon Short Line railroad at Boise, Idaho.

In 1891 Mr. Stacey married Miss Emma E. Lind, daughter of Adam Lind, one of the pioneer settlers of Douglas county, and she had been his assistant in the public schools of Morganville. Mrs. Stacey is a woman of broad culture and is popular in the social circles of Abilene, in which she is a leader. She is matron of the Order of the Eastern Star and has served as president of the Twentieth Century Club. She and her husband have one child, William Arthur, Jr., born Oct. 5, 1892, a student of great promise in the University of Kansas.

Pages 952-953 from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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