Transcribed from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Howard Lincoln Snyder, a prominent physician and surgeon of Winfield, Kan., and the descendant of stanch German ancestry, was born near Eureka, Woodland county, Illinois, Oct. 10, 1878, the son of David Snyder and his wife, who was Miss Mary E. Whittaker prior to her marriage. David Snyder was a native of Ross county, Ohio, but removed to Illinois in 1850, and located in Woodford county, where he maintained his residence forty-five years, or until his death in 1895. He was at one time an extensive cattleman and purchased many herds of cattle in Illinois, which he drove to the eastern markets at Philadelphia and Baltimore. He gave to the Republican party his voting interest, but throughout life was an ardent Prohibitionist in his views as to the liquor question. He was married at the age of fifty and became the father of six children, one of whom, our subject, was named for the martyred president Lincoln, of whom he was a great admirer. His father, John Snyder, was born in southern Pennsylvania, but spent the most of his life in Ohio, where he engaged in farming and where he died. The father of John Snyder, and the great-grandfather of our subject, immigrated to this country from Germany. Mary E. Whittaker, the mother of Dr. Snyder, was the daughter of John D. Whittaker, a native of Greene county, Pennsylvania, who moved to Illinois about 1860, and died in that state in 1884. Shortly after the death of her husband, Mrs. Snyder brought her family to Winfield, Kan., and resided there until her death, in January, 1911, at the close of a serene and beautiful old age. She was a zealous and devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church.

Dr. Snyder finished his literary education in Wesleyan University, Bloomington, Ill., and at Southwestern College, Winfield, Kan. After leaving school he engaged in the stock raising business about three years and then began to prepare for the profession of medicine. He matriculated at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa., from which institution he was graduated in 1904. He then located in Winfield and began the practice of his profession in partnership with Dr. C. M. Holcomb. Later, he practiced alone three years, and then with Dr. L. A. Jacobus formed a partnership which was continued until Sept. 1, 1911, He makes a specialty of surgery and has built up a large and remunerative practice in Winfield and adjacent territory, where he is recognized, not only as an exceptionally able member of the medical profession, but also as a progressive, public-spirited citizen.

On June 3, 1902, occurred the marriage of Dr. Snyder and Miss Glenoril K. Dawson, a graduate of Southwestern College, Winfield, Kan., and the daughter of George W. Dawson, a native of Iowa. Mr. Dawson was engaged in the railway mail service a number of years before becoming postmaster at Tyler, Tex., to which office he was appointed by President Harrison. He now resides in Colorado. Dr. and Mrs. Snyder have four children: Howard, Cecil D., Catherine E. and Robert E. L., aged respectively eight, six, four and two years at this date (1911). Dr. Snyder affiliates fraternally with the Masonic order, in which he has attained the Knight Templar degree, and with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He is a member of the Cowley county and the Kansas state medical societies, the American Medical Association, and the Medical Association of the Southwest. For several years Dr. Snyder has given some few weeks each year to post-graduate study in various eastern cities, thereby keeping in close touch with the advancement in his profession.

Pages 1375-1376 from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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