Transcribed from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Henry T. Salisbury, M. D., the health officer of Coffey county and one of the prominent members of the medical profession of Burlington, was born in Ontario county, New York, Jan. 10, 1867, and is descended from a long line of patriotic colonial ancestors. His great grandfather, Gideon Salisbury, carried arms in the cause of freedom during the Revolution, and his grandfather, John Salisbury, fought for his country against England during the war of 1812. He lived in New York and there George W. Salisbury, Henry's father, was born and reared. He received such educational advantages as the pioneers could afford for their children and after reaching manhood engaged in farming. He was a sturdy supporter of the Democratic party and worked earnestly in its interests. Mr. Salisbury was a member of the Masonic order. Henry Salisbury's maternal great-grandfather, Cornelius Sawyer, was in the army during the Revolutionary war and fought gallantly for the religious and political freedom, which caused his ancestors to cross the sea and settle in America. His son, Cornelius Sawyer, took up arms against the Mother Country during the war of 1812. John Adams, Henry's maternal grandfather, went to Indiana soon after the Revolution and took land in the unbroken wilderness when it was populated only by Indians, so that he is the true son of the frontier. His mother, Mahala Sawyer, was reared in the new country and there met and married George Salisbury. They reared a family and spent their lives in the State of New York.

Henry Salisbury was educated at the academy at Canandaigua, N. Y., where he graduated in 1883. After graduating he came to Kansas City, Mo., and obtained work, through the influence of his uncle, John Salisbury, in the General Hospital in 1884. He remained there for five years, working during the day and studying medicine at night at the University Medical College, where he graduated in 1890. Immediately after receiving his degree Dr. Salisbury accepted the position of contagious physician on the Kansas City board of health and acted in that capacity for two years. He then decided to devote himself to general practice, resigned from the health department and located at Parkerville, Kan., where he opened an office and soon had a promising practice. About three years later he saw a good opening for a young physician and came to Burlington, where he has since remained. Dr. Salisbury is a very energetic man, is always ready to respond to a call and no storm is too severe to keep him from attending patients. He has built up a lucrative practice in Coffey county and made a comfortable fortune. At the present time he is the county health officer, is surgeon for the national guards and for the Missouri, Kansas & Texas and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroads. Dr. Salisbury is an ardent, supporter of the Democratic party and is one of its most prominent leaders in eastern Kansas. He is a member of the Masonic order and his religious affiliations are with the Episcopal church.

Dr. Salisbury married Sarah F., the daughter of William F. Bellemere, of Pennsylvania. He was born and reared in the Keystone State and served as a drummer boy in a Pennsylvania regiment during the Civil war. Mr. Bellemere is a railroad engineer and makes his home in his native state. One son has been born to Dr. and Mrs. Salisbury. He is fifteen years of age and attends the high school in Burlington.

Pages 1031-1032 from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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