Transcribed from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Stanton County, in the western tier, is the second county north from the Oklahoma line. It is bounded on the north by Hamilton county; on the east by Grant; on the south by Morton, and on the west by the State of Colorado. It was first created in 1873 and was named in honor of Edwin M. Stanton, former secretary of war. The boundaries were defined as follows: "Commencing at the intersection of the east line of range 39 west with the north line of town 27 south; thence south along range line to its intersection with the 6th standard parallel; thence west along the 6th standard parallel to the west boundary line of the State of Kansas; thence north along said west boundary line of the State of Kansas to where it is intersected by the north line of township 27 south; thence east to the place of beginning."

Later the county was obliterated and the territory became a part of Hamilton, remaining so until Feb., 1887, when the original lines were restored. Meantime the lands had been settled and towns established. In May, 1887, W. A. Cotterman was appointed census taker. As he went over the county making the enumeration he took a vote on which town should he recommended to the governor as the temporary county seat. A large majority was in favor of Johnson City and Gov. John A. Martin in his proclamation of June 17 designated that place as the temporary county seat. The officers appointed were: county clerk, William H. Quick; commissioners, Charles A. Soper, Frank Woodruff and A. H. Fisher. According to the census there were 2,864 inhabitants, of whom 800 were householders. The number of acres under cultivation was 8,320. The assessed valuation of property was $263,740, of which $145,805 was real estate.

At the first meeting of the commissioners at Johnson City the county was divided into 7 townships, Borders, Falkenstein, Liverpool, Mitchellville, Roanoke, Robinson and Stanton. John J. Martin was appointed sheriff and L. J. Webb employed as county attorney. The election to select a permanent county seat was held on Sept. 27. The number of votes cast was 1,083, of which Johnson City received 703 and became the permanent county seat. The officers chosen were: county clerk, William H. Quick; sheriff, D. G. Childs; register of deeds, J. Y. Callahan; treasurer, P. R. Miner; clerk of the district court, J. F. Blankenship; probate judge, J. S. Falkenstein; county attorney, E. B. Spurgeon; surveyor, H. H. Flannagan; superintendent of public instruction, J. H. McMichael; coroner, N. Rector; commissioners, C. A. Soper, F. A. Woodruff and L. M. Julian. C. H. Harrington was elected representative to the legislature.

The year 1887 was the big boom period in the history of Stanton county. Many new settlers were coming in, outside capitalists were interested, and things were moving fast. In one week parties in Wichita invested $50,000 in Johnson City real estate. In the spring lands adjoining the town sold for $117 per acre and a little later for $174. Three years later the population of the county was not half as large as the census showed at the time of organization. By 1900 it had dwindled to 27 and Johnson City had practically no population. During the next decade, however, the increase was more than threefold, the population for 1910 being 1,034. At that time the county had but 3 townships—Mitchell, Roanoke and Stanton.

The surface is generally level prairie. Bottom lands average one-half mile in width along the streams. Bear creek enters in the west from Colorado and flows northeast into Grant county. The north fork of the Cimarron flows across the southeast corner. A branch of this stream flows directly across the southern portion of the county from the west. Gypsum and magnesian limestone are found in considerable quantities.

The leading crop is broom-corn, which in 1910 brought the farmers $88,606. Milo maize was worth $53,030; sorghum, $34,615; Kafir-corn, $17,760; animals sold for slaughter $11,000. The total value of farm products for the year was $236,789; the value of live stock on hand was $469,670, and the assessed valuation of property was $1,704,066.

Pages 749-750 from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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