Transcribed from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Satanta, "White Bear," a noted Kiowa chief, was born about the year 1830. For about fifteen years prior to his death he was recognized as second chief in his tribe, being outranked by Satank and later by Lone Wolf, neither of whom equaled him in force and ability. For years his fighting qualities made his name one to be feared on the western frontier, and in council his eloquence gained for him the title of "orator of the plains." In spite of his hostility to the white man's civilization, he was a favorite with army officers and commissioners, who admired him for his directness and keen humor. In 1867, Henry M. Stanley, the famous explorer, then a young newspaper correspondent, accompanied Gen. Hancock on his expedition to the Indian country, and under date of May 3, 1867, describes a pow-wow between Satanta and Gen. Hancock. Satanta attended the Medicine Lodge conference and signed the treaty of 1867, which provided that the Kiowas should go on a reservation. The tribe delayed coming in until compelled by Gen. Custer, who seized Satanta and Lone Wolf as hostages for the fulfillment of the agreement. For boasting of his part in a murderous raid in Texas in 1871, Satanta, Satank and Big Tree were arrested and held for trial. Satank was killed while resisting arrest, while his companions were tried and sentenced to life imprisonment in the Texas penitentiary. Two years later they were released, conditional upon the good behavior of the Kiowas, but in the fall of 1874, that tribe again going upon the warpath, Satanta was rearrested and taken back to the penitentiary. Growing despondent in confinement, he committed suicide by throwing himself from the upper story window of the hospital on March 11, 1878. Satanta is described as a typical plains warrior, of fine physique, erect bearing and piercing glance. One who saw him in prison says he was "a tall, finely formed man, princely in carriage, on whom even the prison garb seemed elegant." His memory is cherished by the Kiowa as that of one of their greatest men.

Page 651 from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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