Transcribed from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Salvationists.—The bodies of this religious sect are two in number: The Salvation Army and the American Salvation Army. The history of the organization dates back to 1865, when William Booth, a minister of the New Connection Methodists began to hold open air meetings in London, England, in order to reach the great masses of people in that great city who did not attend any of the established churches. The attendance increased, meetings were held in a tent, then a theater, the movement became known as the East End mission, then the Christian mission. For nearly thirteen years little attention was paid to this organization. Then a great revival took place. The crowds increased, evangelists were sent out to other fields, and in one of the seaport towns an evangelist was spoken of as "captain" in order to attract sailors to his meetings. When it was learned that Mr. Booth was coming he was announced as "general" and the secretary wrote in preparing the program, "The Christian Mission of a Volunteer Army." When Mr. Booth looked it over he erased the word volunteer and substituted salvation, and the title Salvation Army was accepted as the most appropriate for the work which was being undertaken.

At first the movement was looked upon by both Mr. Booth and his wife as supplementary to the work of the churches, but it enlarged and finally developed into a distinctive movement with a people of its own. From the first efforts were made to care for the physical needs of the destitute, soup kitchens were established for relief, various experiments were made for the redemption of the "submerged tenth," which gradually worked out under the three divisions of city colonies, land colonies and over-sea colonies.

One of the first officers to come to America to superintend the work was Thomas E. Moore. Disagreements arose between him and Mr. Booth, who contended that part of the revenues raised in America should go to England, as the work of the army was world wide and no member should call any country his own. Moore believed that money raised in this country should be expended here, and this led, in 1882, to the formation of an independent army in the United States. It was incorporated in 1884 and an amended charter was granted in 1885 under the name of Salvation Army of America. Subsequent changes led to the organization of the American Salvation Army. The old army is military in organization but sufficiently democratic to include persons of every social grade within its ranks. It has no formal creed, pays little attention to doctrinal differences, and in general character is Arminian rather than Calvinistic. The government of the army is somewhat autocratic. The general is assisted by officers of every grade and rank, commissioned after passing the examinations of the training schools and giving evidence of ability for the work. Soldiers are usually persons following their work by day and giving their services of evenings, and are seldom paid. Officers receive their support, but no more, and each corps is expected to be self-supporting.

The Salvationists became established in Kansas in the '80s by settlers from the East. In 1890 there were 12 organizations in the state, one in each of the following counties: Bourbon, Butler, Cowley, Douglas, Franklin, Harvey, Miami, Montgomery, Neosho, Sedgwick, Shawnee and Sumner, with a total membership of 307. During the next fifteen years the organizations increased to 16 and the membership to 555. In this state the Salvation army has not the large membership that it has where there are great cities, but it has done a good work in the towns where the organizations are located.

Pages 643-644 from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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