Transcribed from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Frank Wilson Robison, a successful banker of Towanda, Kan., was born at Pekin, Ill., Feb. 14, 1885, and is a son of Archie Leslie and Lida (Richmond) Robison, who are still residents of Pekin. This branch of the Robison family was founded in America by one of that name from Aberdeenshire, Scotland, who came to the United States in 1825 and located in Tazewell county, Illinois. He was a pioneer in that section and became a successful farmer and a prominent figure in the public affairs of Illinois in that day. His son, Frank Robison, was born in Scotland and was twelve years of age when the family emigrated to America. He married a Miss Mary Miars, who with her two brothers were pronounced and active abolitionists and conducted a portion of the famous "underground railroad," thereby assisting many slaves to freedom. Frank and Mary (Miars) Robison were the grandparents of our subject. Their son, Archie Leslie Robison, was born in Pekin, Ill., and was educated in the public schools there and at Wesleyan University, Bloomington, Ill. He began his career as a farmer early in life and has acquired large financial interests. In 1890 he founded a breeding establishment for Percheron horses and in 1900 began the extensive importation of registered Percheron stock. He maintains a herd of 100 brood mares and fillies and is one of the largest breeders and dealers in the United States. Associated with him in that business is his son, Archie Leslie Robison, Jr. James W. Robison was an uncle of Archie L., Sr., and of whom a sketch appears elsewhere in this volume, became a pioneer settler in the White Water valley in Butler county, Kansas, and is one of the most successful and influential men in southwestern Kansas.

Frank Wilson Robison, of this review, was educated in the public schools at Pekin and the Tremont (Ill.) High School. His literary education was supplemented by a course at Brown's Business College, Peoria, Ill., where he was graduated in the spring of 1907. In August of that year he came to Towanda, Kan., where he purchased a block of stock in the Towanda State Bank. He was elected cashier of the bank and in 1909 purchased the holdings of R. H. Hazlett, its president, since when Mr. Robison has had practical control of the bank. His management has been very successful. Large dividends have been earned and his fitness for the business demonstrated to the satisfaction of the community. The bank has a capital of $10,000, an earned surplus of $7,000, and an average deposit of $85,000. Mr. Robison, by strict attention to business and integrity in all of his dealings, has gained the confidence and esteem of the people of Towanda and surrounding territory, and his future as a successful member of the banking world is assured.

On Oct. 28, 1908, occurred the marriage of Mr. Robison and Miss Leila Harris, the daughter of Hon. C. L. Harris, of Eldorado, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. She is a lady of refined and cultivated tastes and is well and favorably known in the social circles of Eldorado and Wichita. Mr. Robison's genial and pleasing personality is not only appreciated in business circles but in fraternal and social circles as well. He is a member of Towanda Lodge No. 30, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. He is a skilled tennis player and is fond of all outdoor and athletic sports, which give him the needed recreation and rest from business cares.

Pages 853-854 from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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