Transcribed from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Reynolds, Milton W., writer and man of affairs, was born in Elmira, N. Y., May 23, 1823, a son of Alexander and Rebecca Reynolds and descended from English colonial stock. In 1827 his parents moved to Coldwater, Mich., where he attended common school and worked on a farm until 16 years of age. He then taught school, attended Albion seminary, entered the University of Michigan in 1853 and graduated in the classical course with the highest honors of the class in 1856. He was editor of the Coidwater Sentinel in 1856-57, when he moved to Nebraska City, Neb., and was editor of the Nebraska City News until 1861. In 1858 he married Miss Sarah Galloway of Livingston, Mich., and the same year was elected to the Nebraska legislature on the Democratic ticket; was reëlected in 1861 on the Union war ticket, and after a protracted struggle was defeated for speaker of the house by a fusion of the Democrats and straight Republicans; was editor of the Detroit Free Press at Detroit, Mich., in 1862; came to Kansas in 1865 and located at Lawrence; was one of the vice-presidents of the Kansas Editorial Association and president of its sixth annual convention in 1871, and during the latter year was one of the incorporators of the Kansas Magazine company. He was also one of the founders of the Parsons Sun and receiver of the Humboldt land office. In 1876 he was elected to the legislature and was also made a regent of the state university, in which institution he was very much interested. The next year he resumed the publication of the Parsons Sun and in 1883 his retirement from the Leavenworth Press ended his activity as a publisher, although he still corresponded for a number of papers, particularly the Kansas City Journal and the Kansas City Times, under the name of "Kicking Bird," a nom de plume he appropriated from the Indian chief of that name. Mr. Reynolds was one of the promoters of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railroad, and it was through his efforts that most of the Osage ceded lands were settled. He died at Edmund, Okla., Aug. 9, 1890, leaving two daughters, Aedwina and Susan.

Pages 578-579 from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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