Transcribed from a supplemental volume of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed October 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM196. It is a single volume 3.


C. G. Page, a cattle dealer of Norton, Kan., was born at Monmouth, Warren county, Illinois, October 8, 1852, son of A. B. and Rebecca (Thompson) Page, the former a native of New Hampshire, and the latter of Ohio. A. B. Page was engaged in the live stock business and our subject attended the country schools, later spending two years in the academy at Kewanee, Ill. Upon leaving school he went to work as brakeman on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railroad, beginning October 8, 1871, just at the time of the Chicago fire, and remaining one year, when he went back to the farm. In the spring of 1873 he came to Kansas, traveling as far as Lowell, Neb., by railroad, from which point he walked and rode with freighters the rest of the way, arriving in this State with but five cents in stamps, and a total stranger to everybody. He took the homestead on which he now lives.

Mr. Page's early experiences in Kansas are interesting. He spent his first night at a place where there were no beds and everybody had to sleep on the floor. A man who had been in a shooting scrape loaned him his overcoat and in the night Mr. Page turned over against the stove and burned a hole in the coat. He was frightened, for the thought the man would kill him. In those days everybody who could do so carried guns, on account of there being so many antelope and buffalo in the country. From April to October one couldn't look in any direction without seeing thousands of buffalo, and there were plenty of Indians in this section at that time. Mr. Page was here when the Indians massacred the white people on the Sappa, and the settlers came into town for protection. There was but one little store in Norton, built of cottonwood logs, and only a few houses. The settlers had to drive sixty-five miles to the railroad. Mr. Page was a freighter and drove a yoke of oxen. On one occasion he was with a train of mules with his ox team and a load of hides. The rest of the train went on and left him, and he was so hungry that he ate some salt pork, which made him very thirsty. He had lost his oxen the night before, so had to walk to the Solomon river, where he drank until he became sick. Mr. Page began buying cattle when he first came to Kansas and seven years was a freighter. After discontinuing the freighting business he still dealt in cattle, which is his business at the present time. He was here during the county seat fight, and in 1874 was elected sheriff, but did not serve. He now has 640 acres of land near Norton, where he took his original homestead, and it is equipped with feed pens for stock. He is feeding several hundred head this year, as it is his custom to deal in cattle and hogs in large numbers. Mr. Page, is a member of the Knights Templars, the Ancient Order United Workman and the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and in politics is a Republican.

On April 15, 1879, Mr. Page married Miss Mary R. Jones, daughter of Oliver L. and Margaret (Hefner) Jones, natives of Indiana. Mrs. Page was born in Lafayette, Ind., April 17, 1861, where she was raised and attended the common schools. Her parents moved to Kansas in 1876, locating in Norton county, where her father engaged in farming and stock raising. Mr. and Mrs. Page have had nine children: Wilburt O. and Welmert G., twins, born February 16, 1880; Charles G., born March 7, 1882; Ora E., born June 29, 1884; Jesse L., born September 5, 1886; Edith O., born 1888; Mabel and Chester, twins, born May 5, 1891, the latter being deceased; and Earle, born December 3, 1895. Edith is married to Harry W. Frame and now lives at Clayton, Mo. All the children were educated at the Norton County High School.

Pages 58-59 from a supplemental volume of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed October 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM196. It is a single volume 3.

gold bar

VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


Background and KSGenWeb logo were designed and are copyrighted by
Tom & Carolyn Ward
for the limited use of the KSGenWeb Project.
Permission is granted for use only on an official KSGenWeb page.


©2002 by Tom & Carolyn Ward

Skyways Button
Home Page for Kansas
Search all of Blue Skyways
including
The KSGenWeb Project
KSGenWeb logo