Transcribed from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Protective Union.—When the constitutional amendment prohibiting the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors within the state was submitted to the people of Kansas, there were a number of citizens opposed to its adoption. On Jan. 21, 1880, a number of these opponents met at Topeka and formed the "People's Grand Protective Union," with the following officers: President, T. W. Cochran; vice-presidents, M. Hoffman, M. Marcus, R. W. Ludington, J. Walruff, A. Weigand and John Trump; recording secretary, L. W. Head; corresponding secretary, C. R. Jones; treasurer, C. Kreipe. The constitution adopted made the Grand Union the supreme authority in the state, with power to organize local unions and make laws for their government, and to levy assessments against such unions for the benefit of the organization. The resolutions, which were unanimously adopted, set forth: "That the prohibition amendment to the constitution of the State of Kansas, if adopted, would be a law, in its practical application, far beyond the public sentiment of the people, and would be inoperative; that its adoption would take the whole subject of temperance out of the power of the legislature, leaving the people without a remedy; laws so stringent that they cannot he enforced, and destructive of all good, because it teaches men not to respect the restraining power of law. The laws now upon the statutes of the state are as stringent as can be enforced, and may be amended or repealed, as public interest and public sentiment shall demand. The amendment, if adopted, would do what no constitution in any state of this Union does; it would legalize the manufacture and sale of liquor, unrestrained by law, and the liquor once purchased, and in the hands of the purchaser, its use cannot be controlled—thereby offering a premium to falsehood, perjury and intemperance."

In April an active canvass was commenced among the brewers and distillers in other states for funds to defeat the amendment, but the work was barren of results, the amendment was ratified by the people at the polls, and the Protective Union passed out of existence.

Page 512 from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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