Transcribed from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Pike's Peak Trail.—One of the numerous thoroughfares leading to the gold fields of western Kansas, before Colorado was cut off, was by way of the Santa Fe trail, up the Arkansas river past Bent's Fort, and on to Cherry creek. This route was known as the "Pike's Peak Trail." On account of its location it was a month earlier than by way of the Platte river, and like all roads leading to the gold fields, was much traveled during the period of excitement. From "The Prairie Traveler," published by Capt. Randolph B. Marcy in 1859, the list of camping places and distances from Westport, Mo., to Denver City, a distance of 685 miles, was as follows: "Westport to Indian creek, 4 3/4 miles; Cedar creek, 8 3/4; Buell creek, 8 1/2; Willow Springs, 9 1/2; '110-Mile' creek, 20 1/4; Prairie Chicken creek, 22 1/2; Big Rock creek, 20; Diamond Spring, 16; Lost Spring, 16; Cottonwood creek, 15 3/4; Turkey creek, 22; Little Arkansas, 23; 'Big Cow' creek, 20; Big Bend of the Arkansas, 20; Walnut creek, 7; Head of Coon creek, 21; Arkansas river, 18; Arkansas river at Fort Atkinson, 19; Arkansas river, 18 3/4; Arkansas river, 19 1/4; Arkansas river, 22; Arkansas river, 22; Arkansas river, 24; Arkansas river, striking the Big Timbers, 20; Arkansas river, 13; Arkansas river, pass Bent's Fort, 24; Arkansas river, opposite mouth of Apishpa creek—Cherokee trail comes in from Arkansas near Bent's Fort, 11; Arkansas river, opposite of Huerfano creek, 9; Arkansas river —Cherokee trail bears to right and leaves the river, 12; Fontaine qui Buille, 15 3/4; Fontaine qui Buille, 17 1/2; Forks of the Fontaine qui Buille, the road to Cherry Creek here leaves the Fontaine qui Buille and bears to the right. (There is a large Indian trail which crosses the main creek and takes a northwest course towards Pike's Peak. Two miles up this trail is a spring of mineral water that gave the stream its name 'The Fountain that Boils') ; Black Squirrel creek, 17 1/2; near head of Cherry creek, 14; on Cherry creek, 7; Cherry creek, 11; mouth of Cherry creek, at the South Platte, at city of Denver."

Thousands of gold seekers reached the mountains by this route, and the rush only ceased with the collapse of the boom.

Pages 478-479 from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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