Transcribed from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Pensineau, Paschal, interpreter and trader among the Kickapoo Indians, was born at Cahokia, Ill., April 17, 1796. His father was a Canadian from Fort La Prairie, near Montreal, and was of pure French blood. His mother was born in Cahokia, her parents being French on the paternal side and half-breed Pottawatomie on the other. Paschal attended a French school about six months when a child and lived at Cahokia until he was about thirteen years old, when he went to live with the Kickapoos, his father at that time being manager of the American Fur company. When nineteen years old he crossed the Mississippi river with the Kickapoos and settled on White river, where he remained for about five years. For five years he lived with the Sacs and Foxes and took part in the Black Hawk war, after which he again joined the Kickapoos who were then living on the Missouri river above Fort Leavenworth. He took a stock of goods with him and represented the American Fur company as its first agent on the Missouri river. He married a Kickapoo woman and in 1844 opened a farm on Stranger creek, near the village of Mt. Pleasant, Atchison county, living there for about ten or eleven years, during which time he also kept a trading house. From there he removed to the Grasshopper (Delaware) river, near the present village of Muscotah. He received his first appointment as interpreter from Gen. William Clark, superintendent of Indian affairs. After the Kickapoos settled on the Missouri river he was again appointed interpreter. He took part in the Mexican and Civil wars, receiving a wound at the battle of Cross Hollow, in the latter. He was never mustered into the service of the United States, he and several hundred Kickapoos doing volunteer duty for the Union army. About 1874 or 1875 he removed to the Indian territory, locating about 7 miles from Shawneetown, on the north fork of the Canadian river, where he died about March, 1884.

Pages 465-466 from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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