Transcribed from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


No Man's Land.—This name was given to a tract of land three degrees in length from east to west, lying between the 100th and 103d degree of longitude, and one-half a degree in width from north to south, extending from 36° 30' to 37° north latitude. It was a part of the lands ceded to the United States by Texas in 1850, and was never attached to any state or territory until 1890, when it became a part of Oklahoma. Having no government it became a sort of rendezvous for outlaws and desperate characters. In 1885 and 1886, during the heavy immigration into southwestern Kansas and southeastern Colorado, many settlers located in No Man's Land, and in the spring of 1887 it was estimated that there was a population of at least 6,000 people within its borders. Many of these settlers had made improvements, but as there were no land offices the matter of titles became of so much moment that the matter was brought before the Kansas legislature at its session in 1887, when a house concurrent resolution relating to the opening of No Man's Land was introduced and passed, as follows:

"Whereas, The public strip in the Indian territory known as No Man's Land has been settled by a thrifty and enterprising people, with the view of acquiring the rights of settlers under the homestead law; and

"Whereas, They are without the protection of courts of justice, and unable to perfect title or acquire rights therein to lands upon which they have settled and made lasting improvements: therefore, be it resolved by the house of representatives of the State of Kansas, the senate concurring therein:

"That our members of Congress and United States senators be and they are hereby requested to use their influence in behalf of such settlers; and that a copy of these resolutions be by the secretary of state forwarded to each of our national representatives."

As no one had title to his property, claim jumping became such a regular business that the settlers organized vigilance committees to deal with the desperadoes, and claim boards whose business it was to pass on all land disputes. Order was soon restored by these agencies.

Pages 370-371 from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

gold bar

VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


Background and KSGenWeb logo were designed and are copyrighted by
Tom & Carolyn Ward
for the limited use of the KSGenWeb Project.
Permission is granted for use only on an official KSGenWeb page.


©2002 by Tom & Carolyn Ward

Skyways Button
Home Page for Kansas
Search all of Blue Skyways
including
The KSGenWeb Project
KSGenWeb logo