Transcribed from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


David Mackie, deceased, was one of those sturdy Scotchmen who have come to the United States, and from an humble station in life forged their way to the front rank among men of affairs. Mr. Mackie was born near Kilburnie, Ayrshire, Scotland, Jan. 1, 1836, and died at Scammon, Aug. 9, 1910. His parents, David and Janet (Barclay) Mackie, lived and died in Ayrshire, Scotland. Mr. Mackie's school days were limited, but he was a close student of affairs, a keen observer, and through the avenues of a wide and extended business career and the school of experience, he became a well informed man on subjects of general interest. He was especially capable in mathematics, in which he often outstripped the college educated.

Mr. Mackie began the battle of life for himself when only nine years of age, becoming then a trapper in a coal mine in Scotland, from which position he earned promotion after promotion until, at the age of twenty-five years, we find him filling the responsible position of superintending engineer for the Barkip Coal & Ironstone Works, in Scotland. This position Mr. Mackie resigned and in 1869, then a married man, came to the United States. On reaching this country he proceeded to Hartland, Wis., where lived an uncle of his wife. The uncle was engaged in farming, and for awhile Mr. Mackie engaged in farming, but that occupation was not to his liking, and securing a position as a machinist, through the influence of his brother, William, he was in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railroad for a short time. This field of activity he liked no better than farming. To coal mining, the occupation of his youth and early manhood, he determined to return. In 1871 he accepted a position with the coal mining firm of Bennett Turner, for whom he installed machinery in mines near Braidwood, Ill. He then became mine foreman, and later superintendent. Here he remained until 1883, when he came to Kansas to accept a position with the Keith & Perry Coal Company, with whom, and their successors, he remained many years, as superintendent of mines. In 1892 Mr. Mackie accepted the position of general superintendent of the mines of the Central Coal & Coke Company, which firm succeeded the Keith & Perry Coal Company, and which also absorbed the business of the Kansas Texas Coal Company, embracing coal mines in Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Wyoming. He held this position until Jan. 1906, when he resigned to retire from active business. His resignation was accepted on the conditions that he remain the consulting engineer of the company, to which he agreed.

In 1883 Mr. Mackie established a home in Scammon, of which town he was a founder and builder. Here he aided in organizing the Scammon State Bank, in 1901, and he became the first president of the bank, and held the position until his death. He was a Thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, and in church faith a Presbyterian. He was an organizer of the Presbyterian church at Scammon, of which he was a trustee. He was a friend of education, of church, of everything that tended toward the public welfare. His life was a success in the business world, and none the less a success as a citizen, for he was anything else than a selfish man, and he sought to serve his fellowmen. He lived true to the teachings of his fraternity, Masonry, of which he was for years a most prominent member, and he lived equally true to the teachings of his church. As a neighbor, husband and father he was highly esteemed and beloved.

Oct. 19, 1860, Mr. Mackie married Elizabeth Kerr, a daughter of Thomas and Jane (Pringle) Kerr. Her father was a prosperous farmer at David's Hill, near Dalry, Scotland. She survives him. Unto their marriage were born the following children: David, Thomas, Janet, George K., Jane, and John W. Janet married Charles M. Swenney, and is deceased.

Pages 481-482 from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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