Transcribed from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Jacob Mack, president of the State Bank, of Soldier, Kan., and one of the leading stock raisers of Jackson county, comes of fine old "Pennsylvania Dutch" ancestry, and has made an enviable record thus far upon life's journey. This is a rapid age, but he has kept the pace and stands forth as one of the successful men of the state. He was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1857, son of Daniel and Matilda Mack, the former a native of Bucks county, where he was reared and received a good common school education, the only equipment for life that his parents were able to afford. After attaining his growth he began to farm in his native county, but removed to Northampton county and some years later returned to Bucks county and purchased a sixty-acre farm, and continued to live there until his death, in 1908, his wife having died three years before. Jacob Mack was reared on his father's farm, helped with all the work, and learned the thrifty traits of the German farmer. His father sent him to the district school to give him a good foundation for his battle in life. Until his eighteenth year he remained in the country and then went to a place near Philadelphia, but he had heard of the chances open in the great New West for a young man and, in 1879, came to Kansas and located first in Atchison county, where he took up land and began to follow the vocation which he knew best. Six years later he moved to Jackson county and located on a 240-acre farm he had bought. He was a fine farmer, having learned in Pennsylvania how to make the soil produce and return many fold for the time and labor spent upon it. He introduced modern methods, made money, and laid it by until, with shrewd foresight, realized that the western land was in time going to be valuable and invested out in the "short grass country" until he owns 2,400 acres that are each day increasing in value. Near his homestead Mr. Mack has leased a ranch of 1,947 acres for nineteen years and runs it in connection with his home farm. He has introduced fine high bred Durham cattle into Jackson county and is known throughout the eastern part of the state as one of its most prosperous cattle breeders. Although engaged in agricultural pursuits and stock raising he has not devoted his entire time to farming to the exclusion of all other business, for, in 1909, he moved to Soldier and is now recognized as one of the leading financiers. Some years ago he became interested in the bank at Soldier, and for the past three years has been its efficient president. He has taken an active part in the political life of the county for years, as a Republican, and stands high in the councils of the party. Fraternally he is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, while he and his entire family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.

On Dec. 26, 1882, he married Mary, daughter of Philip and Sarah (Henney) Hershman, who were born and reared in Pennsylvania but immigrated to Kansas at an early day, being among its pioneer settlers. Two children have been born to Jacob and Mary Mack; Lovin J. is a student at the Kansas Wesleyan University, at Salina, and Sylva is at home. Since coming to Soldier Mr. Mack has become identified with every movement for the improvement and upbuilding of the town and is one of its representative and progressive citizens.

Pages 589-590 from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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