Transcribed from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Sullivan Lomax, a lawyer at Cherryvale, Montgomery county, is one of the well known and popular citizens of that county, where he is on the fifth year of his practice as an attorney. He is a native of Indiana, having been born in Orange county of that state, Aug. 21, 1872, a son of Abel and Tamar (White) Lomax. The father was born and reared in Orange county, Indiana, and the mother was a native of North Carolina. The paternal grandfather was Hon. Quinton Lomax, a native of Tennessee who migrated in early life to Indiana and represented his district in the state senate of Indiana at one time. He was a farmer by occupation. The Lomaxes are of English descent, having come into England with the Lombard merchants, and the original American representatives of the family came to this country about 1750. The maternal grandfather, William A. White, was born in North Carolina and became an early settler of Indiana, establishing his homestead in Orange county. The Whites are also of English descent. The father of Sullivan Lomax died at the age of about forty years and his mother was about thirty-six years old when she passed away. They both died in Indiana. They were the parents of ten children, all of whom but one grew to maturity and six of whom survive at this writing. Sullivan Lomax is the seventh child and the fourth son in order birth. His boyhood days were spent in Indiana until he was thirteen years old, when, upon the death of his parents, July 4, 1885, he came to Kansas and took up his residence at the home of an older brother at Cherryvale. The first school he attended was taught by his oldest brother, who was only seventeen years old at that time, in Orange county, Indiana, the same being a district school known as "The Gravel Run" school. After coming to Cherryvale he completed the course and graduated in the common schools at that place. He resided with his brother in Cherryvale for about two years and then started out for himself, working at anything he could get to do for his board and attending school in the winter. He herded cattle and did all kinds of work until he fitted himself for teaching, which occupation he began at the age of nineteen years and followed consecutively for eight years. In 1900 he was elected county superintendent of schools, was reëlected two years later and served four years and five months in that position. While the incumbent of this office he commenced the study of law and in September, 1905, entered the Kansas University law department, where he graduated with the class of 1907, and was admitted to the bar on June 21 of the same year. He then located at Cherryvale, where he has since been successfully engaged in the practice of his profession. He is the president of the board of education of that place, has always taken an active part in school matters, and has shown a commendable interest in other public affairs. He is a stanch supporter of the Republican party and the principles and measures for which it stands sponsor. His long public service has gained him a wide acquaintance in this section of the state, where his friends are in number as his acquaintances. While county superintendent he was also a member of the Teachers' State Reading Circle Board, which was composed of eight members whose duty it was to select the reading matter for the teachers of the state during each year. He is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, serving as secretary of the local organization for three years, and he is also a member of the Woodmen of the World at Cherryvale, and a member of the Fraternal Aid Associaton.

In 1897 Mr. Lomax was united in marriage to Miss Ada Lewis, daughter of Joseph P. Lewis, of Cherryvale, and three children have been born of this union, viz.: Elzene, died at the age of six years; Otho W., and Marquita.

Pages 423-424 from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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