Transcribed from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Jacob Linn.—A publication of this nature exercises its most important function when it takes cognizance of the life and labors of those citizens who have been of material value in furthering the advancement and development of the commonwealth. Jacob Linn was one of the early settlers of Halstead, a pioneer merchant and banker, and for thirty-five years was a leader in the various phases of progress incident to the growth of this section of Kansas. He was a man of broad mental ken, strong initiative and distinct individuality, and left a lasting impression on the commercial and religious life of Halstead, where he took up his residence in 1876. Jacob Linn was a native of Germany, son of Philip Linn, and was born Jan. 17, 1840. In 1843 he came with his parents to America, the family locating in St. Clair county, Illinois, where his father engaged in farming. At the age of ten, Jacob started forth to earn his living. His capital consisted of a stout heart and willing hands. He journeyed to St. Louis, some thirty miles distant from his father's farm, and secured employment of various kinds, eventually becoming a clerk and locating in Trenton, Ill. He was frugal, honest and capable. He won the confidence and esteem, not only of his employers but of the wholesale' merchants of St. Louis. Through credit extended by the latter he was able, with his savings, to establish a business of his own in Clinton, Clinton county, Illinois, and this venture was highly successful. The health of his children requiring a change of climate, in 1876, he removed to Halstead, Kan., where he had previously purchased 160 acres of land. Here he resumed his mercantile career, establishing the first general store of any importance and continued this interest until 1900. In 1882 he was elected president of the Halstead Bank and remained its head until his death, in 1907. He was one who believed in Kansas as a farming district of great possibilities, and he became one of the large land owners of the state. He was interested as a stockholder in the Kansas State Bank of Newton and the Bank of Mound Ridge, and also in the Halstead Mill & Elevator Company and the Blackwell (Okla.) Milling & Elevator Company. As a banker he was known as a conservative, discriminating financier, and his judgment on land values was infallible. He was an ambitious and tireless worker, and his business methods, integrity and honesty were unquestioned. At his death he left one of the large estates of Kansas, an estate which represents the brain, pluck and energy of a man who, with his peculiar tact, ever saw the propitious moment and availed himself of it. He was a lifelong Republican, but never a politician or an office holder. He was a member of the Presbyterian church and gave generously to its support.

Mr. Linn was married in Trenton, Ill., May 11, 1863, to Miss Mary Risser, daughter of Jacob Risser of that place. Mr. Risser was a native of Germany, who first settled in Richland county, Ohio, and later came to Illinois. Mr. Linn passed away Dec. 22, 1907, his wife having preceded him on Dec. 8, 1903. They are survived by the following children: John H., vice-president of the Halstead Bank; Jacob A., who succeeded his father in the merchandise business in 1908; Amelia A. and Emma E., who reside with Jacob A. in the old home. The tributes of respect, and in many cases of affection, called forth by the death of Mr. Linn have seldom been equaled in the passing away of a citizen of central Kansas. His own standard of life was high and it was seen in the development of those interests which he controlled. In a large measure his life work was finished; it had met to a great extent the fullness of his ambition. In his business life he was the embodiment of honor, as he was in his social and domestic life the perfection of love and gentleness.

Pages 1282-1283 from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

gold bar

VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


Background and KSGenWeb logo were designed and are copyrighted by
Tom & Carolyn Ward
for the limited use of the KSGenWeb Project.
Permission is granted for use only on an official KSGenWeb page.


©2002 by Tom & Carolyn Ward

Skyways Button
Home Page for Kansas
Search all of Blue Skyways
including
The KSGenWeb Project
KSGenWeb logo