Transcribed from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Lincoln, Abraham, 16th president of the United States, was born near Hodgensville, Ky., Feb. 12, 1809. His entire attendance at school was less than one year, but by reading such books as came in his way he acquired a practical education and developed considerable power as a backwoods orator. In early life he removed to Sangamon county, Ill., where in 1832 he was commissioned captain of a company of volunteers and served in the Black Hawk war. The same year he was elected to the state legislature, receiving 205 out of 208 votes in the county, and was instrumental in securing the removal of the state capital from Vandalia to Springfield, where soon afterward he formed a partnership with John S. Stewart for the practice of law. Subsequently he was associated with S. T. Logan, and in 1843 formed a partnership with William H. Herndon which lasted until Mr. Lincoln's death. In 1840 Mr. Lincoln was a presidential elector on the Whig ticket, and in 1846 he was elected to Congress. In 1858 he was nominated for United States senator by the Republicans of Illinois, and his debates with Stephen A. Douglas, his opponent, attracted world-wide attention. He was elected president in 1860 and reëlected in 1864. The history of his administration and the great Civil war is familiar to every American. On Friday evening, April 14, 1865, President Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth while attending a play at Ford's theater in Washington and died the succeeding day. This brief mention of Mr. Lincoln is regarded as appropriate in this work, because in Dec., 1859, he visited Kansas. On the evening of the 1st he spoke at Elwood, and afterward spoke at Troy, Doniphan, Atchison and Leavenworth. Prentis says: "The largest gathering that had ever assembled in Kansas heard him at Leavenworth. His speech was substantially the same as that delivered afterward at Cooper Institute, New York city, and is one of the ablest productions of American statesman."

Page 161 from volume II of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed July 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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