Transcribed from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Clement L. Kimble, president of the Independence State Bank, and a dealer in hardware and farm implements, has in his veins that fine admixture of English and Irish blood that has produced so many sterling American citizens, as he has inherited the best qualities of both races, and no better example of the successful self-made business man can be found in the state. He was born in Adams county, Ohio, Oct. 2, 1870, the son of David and Mary (Connor) Kimble. His paternal grandfather, Elijah Kimble, who was a native of Maryland and of English descent, moved across the mountains at an early day and became one of the pioneer settlers of Adams county, Ohio, where his son, David, was born and reared. This boy was given the best educational advantages afforded at that early day, and after attaining manhood, met and married Mary Connor, whose grandfather emigrated from Ireland, and soon after reaching America became one of the early white settlers of the Ohio valley. In 1885, Mr. Kimble left his home in Ohio, and accompanied by his wife and family, came to Kansas to establish a home. They located in Miami county, where he engaged in farming for years before settling in Paola to enjoy the sunset years of life in a well earned respite from toil. Clement was the only son. He attended the common schools in Ohio before the family came west, he being fourteen years of age at the time of their removal, and entered the district school near his home in Miami county, where he learned habits of steady and methodical industry in the school of farm life. Later he completed a more practical education in the rough school of life, which may be severe, but is most thorough. After attaining his majority, Mr. Kimble came to Independence, and as a young man became one of the organizers of the independence Gas & Oil Company. For twelve years he devoted his time to this industry, but in 1905 he broadened his interests and invested in the implement business, in which he is actively engaged at the present time. After a time he added hardware to his stock and now owns and operates one of the largest houses of the kind in Independence. Desiring a still wider field for his activities, Mr. Kimble became one of the organizers of the Independence State Bank in 1907, and was elected its first president, which position he has continued to hold to the entire satisfaction of the stockholders, who regard him as a most efficient executive of the institution. For seventeen years he has been a resident of Independence and is regarded as one of the successful financiers and prosperous bankers of that community, where he takes an interest in every question pertaining to the welfare and progress of the city. He is prominent in Masonic circles, being a Thirty-second Degree Mason, while in religious belief he is a Presbyterian. In 1905 Mr. Kimble was united in marriage with Cora, the daughter of William and Lillian Dunkin, of Independence, and they have one son, William Dunkin Kimble. Mrs. Kimble, who is a lady of delightful and cordial manner, is one of the leaders in all church and charitable work, and is a popular member of the large social circle of Independence.

Pages 263-264 from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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