Transcribed from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Ingalls, John James, United States senator, was born at Middletown, Mass., Dec. 29, 1833, a son of Elias T. and Eliza (Chase) Ingalls. He was a descendant of Edmond Ingalls, who, with his brother Francis, founded the town of Lynn, Mass., in 1628. In 1855 he graduated at Williams College, Williamstown, Mass., and two years later was admitted to the bar in his native county of Essex. In 1858 he came to Kansas; was a member of the Wyandotte constitutional convention in 1859; and was secretary of the territorial council in 1860. While secretary of the state senate in 1861, at the first session of the state legislature, he submitted a design for a state seal (see Seal of State), and in 1862 was elected to the state senate. During the Civil war he served as judge advocate on the staff of Gen. George W. Deitzler, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and in 1864 was nominated for lieutenant-governor on the "Anti-Lane" ticket. Mr. Ingalls married Miss Anna L. Cheeseborough of Atchison, Kan., in 1865, and in 1873 was elected to the United States senate to succeed Samuel C. Pomeroy. He was twice reëlected and served in the senate for 18 years, part of that time being the presiding officer. He was a great reader, a close student of men and events, a fine parliamentarian, and was probably the readiest man in debate that ever represented Kansas in the upper house of Congress. Senator Harris of Tennessee said of him: "Mr. Ingalls will go down in history as the greatest presiding officer in the history of the senate." Mr. Ingalls was possessed of fine literary talent, and had he turned his attention in that direction instead of entering politics, his name would no doubt have been among the great writers of the country. His poem entitled "Opportunity," which has been widely quoted, is a classic. He died at Las Vegas, New Mex., Aug. 16, 1900. The writings, including essays, addresses and orations of Mr. Ingalls, were published in 1892 by Mrs. Ingalls. The book is dedicated to the people of Kansas.

Page 937 from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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