Transcribed from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Theodore H. Hurd, deceased, gained during his life a reputation as an able lawyer and just judge which was not confined to this state alone. Well fitted by nature and education for his chosen profession, he combined intelligence, logical reasoning and self-possession with a tenacity of purpose which made him a successful attorney and astute judge. He never gave up active life and to the end of his long and useful life was as kind, dignified and resourceful as he had ever been, taking an interest in politics and all public questions. Theodore H. Hurd was born at Pawling, Dutchess county, New York, Dec. 1, 1819, a son of Jarius Hurd, a farmer of Dutchess county, whose ancestors settled in New York during colonial days. At an early age Theodore was sent to Casenova Academy, where he graduated. After leaving school he taught for two years in Virginia, but returned to New York to read law in the office of Horatio Seymour, of Utica. Subsequently he was in the office of B. Davis Nixon and graduated with the law class of 1847, in Utica. Within a short time he entered into partnership with Judge Joshua A. Spencer. While living in Utica he made the acquaintance of Roscoe Conkling, and the friendship thus formed was only terminated by the death of the senator. In 1854 business brought him to Kansas and he was so pleased with the spirit of the new West that he determined to make the new territory his home. In 1859 he settled in Leavenworth, and the same year became a partner of H. Miles Moore under the firm name of Moore & Hurd. When Mr. Moore entered the army the partnership was dissolved and after that Mr. Hurd continued alone. From the first he made a special study of constitutional and corporation law and soon became a recognized authority upon those subjects. When the Missouri Valley Insurance Company was formed he became its attorney and retained this position through all the litigation which followed the appointment of a receiver and the closing up of the business of the company. The Kansas Pacific railroad retained him as its attorney soon after it was chartered and he held the same office after the road was bought by the Union Pacific railroad. He was the attorney for the Kentucky syndicate that owned Flacker's addition to Leavenworth, and was also retained by the Great Western Manufacturing Company. His association with the railroads brought him into prominence all over the state and hardly an important case came up in Kansas that his services were not sought. In 1884, when Judge Brewer resigned from the state supreme court to accept an appointment on the bench of the United States supreme court, Governor Glick appointed Mr. Hurd to fill out the unexpired term. He was a stanch Democrat in politics and heartily supported that party. The judge was a member of the Leavenworth and Kansas State Bar Associations and represented the latter at a convention of the national association. Fraternally he was affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, being a charter member of Calvary lodge, and assisted in organizing the Leavenworth cornmandery of the Knights Templars. Shortly before his death he had completed a tedious case as referee, and had just made his report when he was taken ill with la grippe and he passed suddenly away on the morning of Feb. 22, 1899, at his home.

Aug. 25, 1862, Judge Hurd married Clara E. Moak, of Schoharie county, New York, daughter of Reuben and Mary (Taylor) Moak. Her father, who came of good old German stock, was born in Schoharie county in 1800, and after reaching manhood became one of the leading business men of Sharon. He died in Wisconsin in 1866. Mrs. Hurd's mother was also a native of Schoharie county. She was a woman of fine character and reared her twelve children in the Baptist faith. Judge and Mrs. Hurd had three children. Mrs. Hurd died in 1911.

Pages 893-894 from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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