Transcribed from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Walter Scott Hudiburg, M. D., one of the younger, but well known, members of the medical profession of Montgomery county, is a native of the Sunflower State, the descendant of sturdy German stock, and has inherited many of the best qualities and attributes of that nationality. He was born in Independence township, Montgomery county, Kansas, Feb. 6, 1878. His paternal grandfather, John Hudiburg, was a native of Indiana, and with his wife and about fifteen other families, emigrated from that state in 1869, at the time when so many emigrants were leaving the Eastern and Northern States, and located on a farm in Montgomery county. He met his death by being bitten by a rattlesnake and was laid to rest in Mount Hope cemetery, at Independence. Dr. Hudiburg's maternal grandfather, Robert S. Parkhurst, also came to Kansas from Indiana in 1869, and settled near Independence, where he now (1911) resides, at the advanced age of over eighty-eight years. Louis W. Hudiburg and Abigail Parkhurst were both born and reared in Indiana; they met and were married in that state, where three of their children were born. In the fall of 1869, in company with their parents they made the long and tedious trip to the new country in the West, for there were few railroads west of the Mississippi river at that early day, and the journey had to be made by water and prairie schooners. For a time Mr. Hudiburg and his family lived at Independence, but he soon took up a homestead in independence township Montgomery county, built a house and established a home. There Walter S. was born. The family remained on the old homestead until 1881, when they sold the old farm and moved to a new one near Sycamore in the same county. Mr. Hudiburg was a tiller of the soil all his life; he loved the outdoor life and made a comfortable fortune, though still a young man as we now regard years, when he died at the age of fifty-six, on Sept. 16, 1890. His widow now lives on a farm in Independence township, Montgomery county. Nine children, grew to maturity and are now living, were born to bless the Hudiburg home: seven sons and two daughters. Walter S. was reared in the country, led the life of a farm boy, going to school winters and working at all the different occupations on a farm in the summer time, but he was ambitious, the desire had grown with him to enter one of the learned professions and at the age of twenty-three he began the study of medicine. Mr. Hudiburg entered the Kansas City Medical College, now the medical department of the University of Kansas, and graduated with honor in the class of 1905. After being out of school for some years it is difficult for any man to return to the desk and laboratory and great credit should be given Dr. Hudiburg for the perseverance, determination and tenacity which enabled him to return to the school room and in so short a period complete one of the hardest and most technical of college courses. Immediately after receiving his degree, the Doctor located at Sycamore, Kan., for the practice of his profession, but two years later saw that there was an excellent opening for a physician in Independence and removed there, where he has since been engaged in actively building up his present gratifying and growing practice. He is a general practitioner, but is also a skillful surgeon and by his delightful manner, cordial sympathy and kindness of heart has gained the confidence of the people of the city where he has elected to make his home. Dr. Hudiburg is a member of the Montgomery County Medical Society and the Kansas State Medical Society. He is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Modern Woodmen of America. On Feb. 15, 1906, he was united in marriage with Myrtle Waggoner.

Pages 89-91 from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

gold bar

VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


Background and KSGenWeb logo were designed and are copyrighted by
Tom & Carolyn Ward
for the limited use of the KSGenWeb Project.
Permission is granted for use only on an official KSGenWeb page.


©2002 by Tom & Carolyn Ward

Skyways Button
Home Page for Kansas
Search all of Blue Skyways
including
The KSGenWeb Project
KSGenWeb logo