Transcribed from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


H. C. Hook

H. C. Hook, Doctor of Osteopathy, at Hutchinson, Kan., was born at Memphis, Scotland county, Missouri, Sept. 26, 1851, son of James H. and Sarah (Morris) Hook, natives of Pendleton county, Kentucky. The Hook family is of English origin, the earliest members having come to America in the Mayflower, were among the first settlers in New England, and played no small part in the war of the Revolution, which separated the colonies from the Mother Country. Richard Morris, the maternal grandfather, was a soldier in the war of 1812 and was present at the battle of the Thames, where Chief Tecumseh was killed. He was an eye witness of this event and often related the circumstances. The Morris family came to America from Scotland, and thus Dr. Hook is descended on both sides of the family from two of the sturdiest races of Europe. His parents emigrated from Kentucky at an early day and in 1849 became pioneer settlers of northeastern Missouri, where they passed their lives and were at last laid to rest.

Dr. Hook was reared on his father's farm, attended the district school in the winter, planted corn, plowed, herded cattle, and led the average life of the country boy in the summer, learning practically how to farm. He also learned the carpenter's trade and became a well known builder and contractor in Missouri, where he was occupied by that vocation until 1884, when he came to Kansas and continued at that trade in Barber county two years. In 1886 he moved to Morton county, in the western part of the state, and was elected the first treasurer of the county, but resigned when elected. He was reëlected for the next term as treasurer, serving two years, from 1889 to 1891. During the latter year he went to Oklahoma, again followed farming and contracting, made considerable money, and remained until 1899. For some time he had been interested in osteopathy and determined to devote his life to its study and practice. With this end in view he went to Kirksville, Mo., and entered the American School of Osteopathy, where he graduated in 1901. Immediately after leaving the college he located at Hutchinson for the practice of his profession, and within a short time built up a satisfactory and lucrative practice. The second year in Hutchinson he purchased a building on East First street, and opened a sanitarium, which proved such a success that in 1909 he built a brick building, at the corner of First and Washington streets, and moved the sanitarium into the new structure, where seven rooms on the ground floor are devoted to caring for the numerous patients who daily visit Dr. Hook for treatment. These offices and operating rooms have every modern equipment and convenience and are admirably adapted to the purposes for which they are designed. As the work continued to grow, Dr. Hook found that he had more than he could handle alone and engaged an assistant, Dr. Koelling, who is also a graduate of the Kirksville school. The two physicians have established a fine reputation in Hutchinson and the surrounding country and patients come from a considerable distance for treatment. They are regarded as among the most successful and prosperous men in the profession.

In 1873 Dr. Hook married Nancy J. Rose, of Sullivan county, Missouri, and they have six children: Ivan L. is in the barber business at Hutchinson; Carl Johnson is a banker at Ponka City, Okla.; Bertha D. is the wife of C. C. Spence, of Horton, Kan.; Lillie is the wife of Ralph Lamberth, a cooper of Hutchinson; Iva is Mrs. Estell Curtis, of Hutchinson, Kan.; and Clohe is at home. The family are members of the Christian church. Dr. Hook is a member of the Woodmen of the World, and in politics is a stanch Democrat, but has never cared for political life, as he devotes his entire time and attention to his professional work.

Pages 1336-1337 from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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