Transcribed from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Charles King Holliday.—The simple fact that a man becomes a pillar and a patriot in his community does not necessarily imply that his offpring shall measure up to the same degree of excellence and good citizenship. In truth, the contrary is quite the rule. Seldom does the son of a prominent father display those qualities which formed the base of the latter's greatness, and instances in which a son, by his own conduct and achievements, has not only maintained the standards of a distinguished parent, but has brought additional lustre In the family name, are rare indeed. Occasionally there will be an example of this sort, however, and in such cases it is but meet and fit that at least modest mention of the son should accompany any extended account of the father. Hence no apology is made for supplementing the foregoing sketch of a distinguished Kansan with a brief mention of his only son, Charles King Holliday, who is now a prominent figure in the business and social life of the city of which his father was father and founder.

Charles King Holliday, lawyer, scholar, and gentleman of affairs, of Topeka, Kan., was born at Meadville, Pa., Feb. 12, 1859, the only son of the late Cyrus Kurtz Holliday and his wife, Mary (Jones) Holliday, of the preceding record. He was reared to manhood in Topeka, and though he has been temporarily absent from it several times in the pursuit of study and the discharge of duty, that city has been his home all his life, and his interest in the welfare and growth of the Capital City is no less enthusiastic than was that of his father, who founded it. Charles King Holliday received his early educational training in the Topeka public schools. Later, he graduated at both Washburn College and the University of Kansas, and still later graduated from the law department of Yale, after which he spent three years abroad, finishing his education in the schools of France and Germany. Although a lawyer by profession, much of Mr. Holliday's attention has been given to other matters, in 1888 he was secretary of the United States legation at Caracas, Venezuela, receiving the appointment from President Grover Cleveland, and from 1890 to 1894, he served as one of the commissioners of the World's Columbian Exposition, at Chicago, receiving the appointment from President Benjamin Harrison. He is connected officially with many of Topeka's large financial enterprises and was formerly president of the Topeka Gas company, holding that position for eight years—from 1900 to 1908. He is a prominent member of the Topeka Commercial Club and for three years served as its president. A Republican in politics, he served for four years as a member of the Topeka city council, and for two years he served as a member of the board of police commissioners, receiving his appointment from Governor Morrill. He is a member of Grace Episcopal Church, of the Elks Club, and of the Country Club, all of Topeka.

On Dec. 12, 1887, Mr. Holliday was united in marriage to Miss Jeanette Hamilton, daughter of Col. E. R. Hamilton, a pioneer of California, and banker of Sacramento. Mr. and Mrs. Holliday have one daughter, Miss Elizabeth Holliday, who is now a young lady, and a graduate of the Topeka High School.

With all of those qualities which essentially belong to good citizenship, Mr. Hoiliday is generously endowed. A man of generous impulses, whose dominant traits of character are ever enlisted under the banner of progress, and whose influence is constantly exerted toward the moral uplift of his community, he is a fine type of the modern, wide-awake, American citizen and business man, and a splendid example of courtly and cultivated refinement and gentility.

Pages 44-45 from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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