Transcribed from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Scott N. Higinbotham, a successful coal dealer of Manhattan, Kan., bears the distinction of being not only one of the city's leading business men but also one of its native born citizens, having been born there Dec. 1, 1871. He is the son of George W. and Adelia E. (Newell) Higinbotham, the former born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, in 1829, a descendant of an old English family, a member of which came to America in Colonial times and founded the family of that name in this country. The early youth of George W. Higinbotham was spent on his father's farm, but at the age of fourteen he came westward to Indiana, where he secured employment in a store and received $4 wages per month. A number of years later he went to the State of Illinois, where he was married, and in 1856, shortly after his marriage, he came to Leavenworth, Kan., where for two years he was engaged in freighting across the plains, for at that time Kansas was not the network of railroads it is now. In 1858, with two of his brothers, he took up land in Riley county, Kansas, but about one year later he traded his land to a Mr. Miller for a stock of goods and engaged in the mercantile business in Manhattan. He and his brothers became army contractors during the Civil war, supplying the government with grain and hay, and continued in that business until 1865. One of his brothers had died in the meanwhile, and at the close of the war the other brother opened the Blue Valley Bank, which is now the Union National Bank of Manhattan. George W. Higinbotham continued in the mercantile business, however, and was thus identified throughout almost the whole of his business career. To his first marriage one child was born. His second marriage occurred in 1860 and united him with Adelia E. Newell. To them were born four children: Esther L., now the wife of Rev. J. B. Robinson, of Mankato, Kan.; Cornelia, now Mrs. W. B. Leicester, of Frederick, Kan.; Mary, who died when three years of age; and Scott N., of this record. The father died in 1899, but the mother is still living in Manhattan.

Scott N. Higinbotham was reared in Manhattan and received his early education in the public schools of his native city. After completing that work he attended a military school at Reading, Pa., where he graduated. He then matriculated as a student in Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill., and was graduated in the law department, in 1896, with the degree of LL. B., but he never practiced the profession for which he prepared. He returned to Manhattan and was associated with his father in business three years, or until the latter's death, after which he continued the business alone and has proved himself to be the possessor of fine business tact and all the attributes essential to success. In 1900 Mr. Higinbotham was united in marriage to Miss Anna V. Hanson, the daughter of John Hanson, of Seattle, Wash., and they have one daughter, Mary A. Higinbotham, who is now in school. Mr. Higinbotham is a Republican in politics, belonging to that branch of the party which at the present is styled the "Progressive," and is a stanch believer in the new nationalism as promulgated by Theodore Roosevelt in his famous Osawatomie address. He is a Knight Templar Mason and has served as past eminent commander of his commandery. He is also a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, in which he has attained the office of exalted ruler. Both Mr. and Mrs. Higinbotham are communicants of the Episcopal church,

Pages 139-140 from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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