Transcribed from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Henry Hedderman, a well known general contractor of Topeka, Kan., is a native of the Emerald Isle, having been born in County Limerick, Ireland, in 1853. He was reared and educated in his native land and early in life learned the stone cutter's trade under the direction of his father, John Hedderman, a general contractor. In 1870 the family came to America and located in Cincinnati, Ohio, but in 1872 removed to Lousiville, Ky., where the father followed the contracting business until his death, in 1890. During all of those years Henry Hedderman was associated with his father, and many of the best public buildings and residences a quarter of a century ago in the city of Louisville were constructed by John Hedderman & Son. In 1877 Henry Hedderman removed to Kansas City, Mo., where he engaged with B. Lantry. & Sons, general contractors, in the capacity of foreman and remained with that firm five years. B. Lantry & Sons did a great deal of railroad contracting, and it was while Mr. Hedderman was superintending the building of the first Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe round house, machine shops and other buildings in Topeka for that firm that he became interested in the city and decided to locate there. Those buildings were the first additions the Santa Fe made to the old bridge building. On locating in Topeka Mr. Hedderman began contracting on an extensive scale and for a great number of years built round houses machine shops, depots, bridges and did all manner of construction work for and along the Santa Fe system, besides a large amount of contracting in Topeka. During these years he was investing his surplus earnings in Shawnee county farm lands and city realty, and at one time he owned over 1,000 acres of fine Kaw bottom land. In course of time his real estate holdings increased in size and value to such an extent that he decided to retire from active contracting and devote his whole time and attention to his large realty holdings. Hence he has not done much contracting for the last two years but has spent his time in disposing of his farm lands and in reinvesting the proceeds in city realty.

In 1879 he was united in marriage to Miss Betty Maloney of Junction City, Kan., the daughter of P. Maloney, one of Geary county's most respected and extensive farmers and stockmen. Mrs. Hedderman is a native of New York City, but came to Kansas with her parents when a small girl and was reared and educated in this state. Mr. and Mrs. Hedderman have two sons, John and Robert, both reared and educated in Topeka and at St. Mary's College. They are both promising young men and the elder, John Hedderman, has decided to engage in general contracting, while Robert has turned his attention to clerical pursuits. Mr. Hedderman is an independent in politics and in local affairs always supports the best man for the office, regardless of party. He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the family are all members of the Roman Catholic church. He has been very successful during his business career and claims that the best equipment for a young man starting in life is to be honest and industrious.

Pages 1518-1519 from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

gold bar

VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


Background and KSGenWeb logo were designed and are copyrighted by
Tom & Carolyn Ward
for the limited use of the KSGenWeb Project.
Permission is granted for use only on an official KSGenWeb page.


©2002 by Tom & Carolyn Ward

Skyways Button
Home Page for Kansas
Search all of Blue Skyways
including
The KSGenWeb Project
KSGenWeb logo