Transcribed from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


George M. Hawkins, a successful physician of Dexter, Kan., has spent thirty-five years of a busy, useful life in Kansas, and is one of the many Eastern men who have been so closely identified with the growth and development of this great commonwealth. He is a descendant of Revolutionary ancestry, on both the paternal and maternal sides, and is a native of Maine, born in Cumberland county, Jan. 14, 1837, to his parents—Reuben R. and Phoebe (Knight) Hawkins. The father was born in Baltimore, Md., and became a ship builder. Later he removed to Maine and there engaged in farming and also took an active part in the work of the Republican party in Cumberland county, where he served for some time as county commissioner. He was a soldier of the war of 1812, and his death occurred in Maine, in 1891. William Hawkins, the grandfather of George M., was a native of England and came to America when a young man. He served in the Patriot army during the Revolution, and died in Amherst, Mass., whence he had removed from Maryland, where he had first located upon coming to this country. William Knight, the maternal grandfather of Dr. Hawkins, also was a soldier in the Revolution and was captured twice during that great struggle, once by the British and once by the Indians. While a captive of the Indians, the chief whose duty it was to guard Mr. Knight, went fishing and took his prisoner with him. The captive quietly awaited his opportunity to escape and when it came dealt the Indian a stunning blow, threw his body into the river and made his escape. For years afterward the Indians endeavored to recapture Mr. Knight but were never successful.

Dr. George M. Hawkins received his common school education in the public schools at Watertown, Mass., and his collegiate education at Bolton College, Brunswick, Me. He had a sum of $600 with which to defray his educational expenses, which sum, augmented by his earnings as a school teacher, enabled him to obtain the best of educational advantages. Upon completing his literary education he at once began his professional studies and was graduated in the medical department of the University of New York, in 1858. He began the practice of medicine at Naples, Me., and was thus engaged until the opening of the Civil war, when he enlisted in Company I, Tenth Pennsylvania regiment, and served twenty-two months. He was severely wounded at the second battle of Bull Run, where he was struck by an exploding shell. Two years after leaving the service he began to practice medicine at Minneapolis, Minn., where he remained until 1876, removing to Kansas in that year in order to have the advantages of a milder climate. He located at Dexter, Cowley county, and in the thirty-five years that have intervened since then he has built up a very extensive country practice, covering some three or four counties. In connection with his practice he does minor surgery. He has ever remained a student, alert for the latest discoveries and advances made in his profession, and to keep in touch with others of his profession he holds membership in the county and state medical societies and the American Medical Association. He is now the oldest medical practitioner in Cowley county, both in point of age and of service in the profession.

In 1861 Dr. Hawkins was united in marriage to Miss Susan Culp of Minnesota. Dr. and Mrs. Hawkins have six children living: Jennie, Edwin, Clara, Harry, Susan and Minnie. Mrs. Hawkins and the children are members of the Christian church. Dr. Hawkins affiliates fraternally with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Sons and Daughters of Justice.

Pages 1468-1469 from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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