Transcribed from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Richard S. Haury.—To the medical profession many accord the position of highest rank and responsibility in the field of professional activity. It is a calling in which success depends upon individual merit, and he who wins distinction must necessarily possess strong mentality, energy, and a keen regard for the responsibility devolving upon him. Dr. Haury, whose specialty is surgery, though comparatively a young man has already demonstrated that he possesses the requisite qualities for an able medical and surgical practitioner. Dr. Haury was born in Trenton, Clinton county, Illinois, Sept. 27, 1872, son of Daniel and Anna (Strohm) Haury, natives of Germany, where the former was born near the city of Munich. Daniel Haury came to America with his father when eleven years of age. The family located in Illinois, where Daniel Haury was married prior to the removal of both families to Harvey county, Kansas, in 1875. The father of Dr. Haury purchased a farm in Halstead township, on which he still resides and which he has developed into valuable property. He is a Republican, and while he takes no active interest in politics has always supported the men and measures of that political organization. John Haury, grandfather of Dr. Haury, died in St. Louis while making a visit in that city. The maternal grandfather, Strohm, was also a native of Germany and immigrated to this country in 1856, locating first in Iowa but later removing to Illinois. He died in Iowa. Richard Haury was graduated at Bethel College, Newton, Kan., with the class of 1889, and then taught school two years, after which he attended the University of Kansas until through the junior year, when he entered the medical department of Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill., where he was graduated in 1902. He returned to Harvey county, Kan., where he assumed charge of the practice of his uncle, Samuel S. Haury, for one year. He then located for practice at Mound Ridge, McPherson county. In December, 1905, he became house physician of the Halstead (Kan.) Hospital, where he remained until 1907, when he visited Berlin, Germany, where he completed a post-graduate course in surgery in the Berlin University. He also visited Berne, Switzerland, and spent a short time in surgical work in the University of Berne, under Professor Kocher. In 1908 he returned to his old home in Newton, Kan., where he has since been associated in practice with his uncle, Dr. S. S. Haury. Having especially prepared for surgery, he specializes in that part of their practice and is also a member of the medical corps of Bethel Hospital. He keeps in close touch with the advanced thought and discoveries of his profession. He is a member of the Harvey County Medical Society, of which he is now president (1911); of the Kansas State Medical Society, and of the American Medical Association. On June 1, 1903, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. Haury and Miss Linda A. Krehbiel, daughter of John J. Krehbiel, who, in 1879, came to Kansas from Iowa, to which state he had removed from the East. He settled in Newton, and operated a wagon manufactory for many years. He was intimately associated with Rev. David Goerz the founder of Bethel College, and has been a generous benefactor of the institution. Dr. and Mrs. Haury have two children—Florence, born Oct. 9, 1905, and Mildred H., born Aug. 17, 1909. The family are members of the Mennonite church. Mrs. Haury is a woman of broad culture and refinement and is popular in the social circles of Newton, in which she is a leader.

Pages 1111-1112 from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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