Transcribed from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Steven Hugh Hale

Steven Hugh Hale, a prominent and wealthy citizen of Neodesha, Kan., who has wrested a fortune from the oil and gas fields of southern Kansas, is one of America's army of self-made men who have risen to affluence and prominence because they possessed the requisite ability and the equally necessary quality of industry. Born at Springfield, Mo., Dec. 29, 1866, his school days were passed at Eureka, Kan., and ended when he was fourteen years of age. He began his independent career at that early age by being employed to run a stationary engine, receiving $50 per month wages—a very remunerative reward for one of his years. In 1883 he went to California and remained one year. On his return he assisted his father in the mercantile business. He next became, in 1887, an employee of the St. Louis & San Francisco Railway Company, with whom he remained fifteen years, first in the capacity of a freight brakeman; was then advanced to the position of freight conductor, and two years later was made a passenger conductor. In 1902 he resigned as conductor and began mining at Joplin, Mo. This proved a very profitable venture, but in 1903 he sold his interests and invested his capital in oil and gas leases in southern Kansas. He was the first independent producer in that field and now holds the controlling interest, both in the Troost Hill Oil & Gas Company and in the Cherryvale Gas, Light & Power Company. His company furnishes the gas for Cherryvale and for Neodesha. Mr. Hale is the inventor of the Hale gas mixer, which is a great saving in the use of gas, which the American Stove Company has adopted, paying him a handsome royalty. The father of Mr. Hale (H. L. Hale) was born in Knoxville, Tenn., and early in his career was engaged in buying mules in the North and shipping them to the south. He is a veteran of the Civil war, in which conflict he served on the Union side. Coming to Kansas in 1876, he took up a claim and also bought land in Greenwood county, but later engaged in the milling business at Eureka, Kan. He now resides in Neodesha. The mother of our subject was Melcina Julian, prior to her marriage to H. L. Hale. Her father, Steven Julian, served as a captain and with distinction in the Civil war. He raised two companies, one for the Fourteenth Missouri infantry and one for the Second Missouri light artillery, and during his service participated in a number of the severest engagements of the war. He is now nearly ninety years of age and resides in Neodesha with his daughter, Mrs. Hale. In 1894 was solemnized the marriage of Steven Hugh Hale and Miss Emma, daughter of Henry Kimball, one of the earliest settlers of Neodesha, which city is still his home. Two children have been born of this marriage: Thelma is in school, and Hugh Edward is three years of age (1911). Both Mr. and Mrs. Hale are members of the church of Christ, Scientist, and he sustains fraternal membership with the Masons and Elks. In the Masonic order he has attained the Scottish Rite degrees and is a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, in political affairs Mr. Hale is a Republican and in 1905 was elected mayor of Neodesha. Industry, tireless energy, and shrewd business judgment are the concomitants which have accomplished Mr. Hale's remarkable success, for he is yet a young man and has already made a comfortable fortune, but it represents the result of his own ability and well directed efforts. As a citizen he is popular and progressive, and in building his own fortune he has contributed no small part to the prosperity and development of his city and state. In 1908 he erected what is known as the Hale Block in Neodesha, the best business block in the town.

Pages 416-417 from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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