Transcribed from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Hoch, Edward W., governor of Kansas from 1905 to 1909, was born at Danville, Ky., March 17, 1849. After attending the common schools he entered Central University at Danville, but did not graduate, leaving the institution to enter a newspaper office, where he spent three years in learning the printer's trade. He then came to Kansas and preëmpted 160 acres of land near Florence, Marion county, where he engaged in farming. The fascinations of the newspaper office were too strong to be resisted, and in 1874 he gave up farming and bought the Marion Record. Mr. Hoch now had a taste of the troubles of the country editor. That was the great grasshopper year and for some time his paper had a struggle for existence. With the passing of the grasshopper plague times began to improve, and by 1876 he had paid his debts. On May 23, 1876, he celebrated his success by marrying Miss Sarah L. Dickerson of Marion. Mr. Hoch soon became one of the active editors of the state in proclaiming Republican doctrines, which brought him into prominence in the councils of that party. In 1888 he was elected to the lower house of the state legislature, and in 1892 was again elected a member of that body. That was during Gov. Lewelling's administration, when there were two houses of representatives, and Mr. Hoch was an influential factor in the settlement of the vexed question, so that the state supreme court recognized the Republican house. His conduct on this occasion won him many friends within his party, and in 1894 he received considerable support in the state convention for governor. In 1904 he was elected governor, and at the close of his first term was reëlected. He retired from the office in Jan., 1909, when he was succeeded by Gov. Stubbs. Since that time Gov. Hoch has devoted the greater part of his time to the lecture platform. He is a pleasing and forcible speaker, and is in demand by Chautauqua assemblies, etc. The active management of his paper has devolved upon his son, Homer Hoch.

Page 848 from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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