Transcribed from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Highland University.—Of all the educational institutions in Kansas, this is the oldest. Its origin may be said to date back to 1837, when the Presbyterian board of foreign missions started a mission among the Iowa and Sac Indians in what is now Doniphan county. Rev. S. M. Irvin was the first missionary sent out. He was soon joined by Rev. William Hamilton and they worked together in establishing an Indian school. The country was opened to white settlement in 1854, and in 1855 the town of Highland was laid out, 2 miles west of the old mission. As early as 1856 a school for white children was commenced in a log cabin, the first house on the premises. This cabin was replaced by a frame building, the management of the school was transferred to the "Highland Presbytery," and it became known as the "Highland Presbyterian Academy." At this time it was a classical academy, not large but quite well organized. In Nov., 1857, the Highland Presbytery appointed a board of nine trustees to take charge of the institution, with a request that they apply to the legislature for a charter. In response to their petition the legislature of 1857, granted a charter under the name of the "Highland University."

By this charter the control of the institution was given to the presbytery, but an act passed in 1866 transferred the control to the synod of Kansas, thus securing it to the Presbyterian church. The synod was to appoint nine trustees who were to assume the active management of the school. The first college building, a substantial brick structure, was located on a tract of 8 acres, and in addition to this the university owned some 200 lots in the town. In 1868 the property was valued at $15,000 and the school had over 100 students. Since then the institution has grown until it now has a preparatory and an academic department. The endowment has been increased and it is one of the leading denominational schools in the state.

Pages 843-844 from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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