Transcribed from a supplemental volume of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed October 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM196. It is a single volume 3.


John Gilman, influential citizen; now retired, of Madison, Kan., and the last survivor among the early pioneers of Greenwood county, was born at Chelsea, Vt., March 25, 1830. His ancestors, both paternal and maternal, were among the early settlers of New England and were of Scotch descent. He was reared a farmer and obtained his education in the schools of his native State. In 1859 he decided to seek opportunity for advancement in the West and came to Leavenworth and from there went overland by wagon to Pike's Peak. He spent a few months prospecting in the Rockies and then returned to Kansas, where he located a homestead in Greenwood county, nine miles southeast of where the present city of Madison was built. His nearest post office at the time was Shell Rock, which was abandoned in 1884. On the call of President Lincoln for volunteers in 1861 he enlisted as a private in Company E, Fifth Kansas cavalry, and served under Col. Powell Clayton from January 4, 1862, to January 9, 1865. He was in a number of important engagements, including the battles of Pine Bluff, Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove, Ark., but was never wounded seriously. On completion of his military service he returned to his homestead in Greenwood county and engaged in farming and stock raising, remaining on this place until 1888, when he became a resident of Madison. With the late William Martindale he was one of the first to settle in this section of Kansas, and is the only survivor of that early settlement. Mr. Gilman realized a substantial success as a farmer and became one of the influential men in his section. From the formation of the Republican party he was a consistent advocate of its principles and policies and took an active part in its affairs in his county. He was appointed postmaster at Madison December 1, 1901, and served until March 1, 1911, when he was succeeded by his son, George Gilman, a sketch of whom follows this article. Mr. Gilman has been one of the useful citizens of his county and enjoys the respect and esteem of the community. He has traveled a great deal and for several years has spent his winters in Florida. He was united in marriage with Miss Mary E. Shaw, a daughter of W. W. and Anne F. (Miller) Shaw, on January 29, 1872. Her father was a pioneer of Greenwood county, locating there in 1869, and served as postmaster of Shell Rock for the fifteen years previous to its abandonment. The Shaw homestead was on the Verdigris river, eight miles southeast of the present city of Madison. He removed to Seattle, Wash., in 1902, where he died in 1908, his wife following to her last rest in that city in 1911. There were eight children in the Shaw family, who are as follows: Mary E., Martha, William F., Charles M., Ida, Alice, Etta and Ina, all of whom are living with the exception of Martha, who died in 1908. Mrs. Gilman was born on May 29, 1850. Mr. and Mrs. Gilman are the parents of eight children, who are as follows: William, born November 23, 1872, died February 19, 1891; Annie M., born May 22, 1874, the wife of Louis J. Fellay; Martha E., born December 10, 1878, the wife of Virgil E. Swain, a merchant of Madison, Kan.; Mary, born January 6, 1884, the wife of Dr. A. L. Warth, a successful veterinarian of Madison; Bessie L., born September 17, 1888, the wife of W. L. Jones, a farmer and stockman; Roy D., born October 17, 1892; Charles Z., born December 15, 1880, a merchant of Madison, Kan., married, in 1909, Miss Hattie Johnston; and George, whose sketch follows.

Pages 542-543 from a supplemental volume of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed October 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM196. It is a single volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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