Transcribed from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Glick, George W., the ninth governor of Kansas after the state was admitted into the Union, was born at Greencastle, Ohio, July 4, 1827, a son of Isaac and Mary (Sanders) Glick. His great-grandfather, Henry Glick, with four brothers, came from Germany during the colonial period, and all served as soldiers in the Continental army during the Revolutionary war. His grandfather, George Glick, served under Gen. Harrison in the War of 1812, and was wounded in the battle of Fort Meigs, not far from the present city of Toledo, Ohio. When Gov. Glick was about five years of age his parents removed to Sandusky county, Ohio, where his father acquired extensive farming interests and became a citizen of prominence, having been elected treasurer of the county three times in succession. Here the future governor of Kansas attended the public schools, and by his studious habits managed to acquire a good, practical knowledge of the English language and higher mathematics. His ambition was to be a lawyer, and soon after leaving school he entered the office of Buckland & Hayes at Lower Sandusky (now Fremont), where he studied for two years, when he was admitted to the bar in 1850 by the supreme court of Ohio, before which tribunal he passed an examination with the students of the Cincinnati Law School. He began practice at Fremont and soon won distinction as a lawyer. A firm believer in the principles advocated by the Democratic party, he cast his political lot with that organization, and in 1858 was nominated for Congress, but declined the honor. The same year he made the race for state senator against Ralph P. Buckland, one of his preceptors, and although defeated led his ticket by nearly 2,000 votes. About a year before this campaign he had been appointed colonel of the Second regiment and judge-advocate of the Seventeenth division of the Ohio militia by Gov. Salmon P. Chase. In the fall of 1858, after his defeat for state senator, Gov. Glick came to Kansas, locating at Atchison, where he formed a partnership with Alfred G. Otis, under the firm name of Otis & Glick, which association lasted for fifteen years. At the election of Dec. 6, 1859—the first election under the Wyandotte constitution—he was the Democratic candidate for judge of the Second judicial district; was a member of the legislature from 1863 to 1868; was the Democratic candidate for governor in 1868, but was defeated by James M. Harvey; was elected to the legislature again in 1875 and also in 1880; served as speaker pro tem in the session of 1876; and in 1882 was nominated and elected governor, being the only candidate on the Democratic state ticket to win a victory. Gov. Glick had been active in political and legal affairs in many other ways. In 1866 he was elected a delegate to the Union convention at Philadelphia, Pa.; he served as county commissioner and auditor of Atchison county; was one of the early directors of the Union Pacific railroad and attorney for the central branch from 1867 to 1874; engaged in farming and stock raising in 1874, his "Shannon Hill" farm of about 600 acres being one of the best known farms in eastern Kansas; was United States pension agent at Topeka from 1885 to 1892; was for over thirty years a member of the state board of agriculture; was treasurer of the board of Centennial managers in 1876; was one of the commissioners to the Chicago exposition of 1893 and the Louisiana Purchase exposition at St. Louis in 1904; was one of the founders of the Atchison Gas company; was the first master of Shannon Hill Grange, Patrons of Husbandry; was a Knight Templar Mason, belonging to lodge, chapter and commandery in Atchison, and on Dec. 7. 1907, he was elected first vice-president of the Kansas Historical Society. On Sept. 17, 1857, Gov. Glick was united in marriage at Massillon, Ohio, with Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. A. Ryder of Fremont. To this union were born a son and a daughter, Frederick H. and Jennie. The son was private secretary to his father while the latter was governor. After a long illness Gov. Glick died at his home on April 13, 1911.

Pages 753-754 from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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