Transcribed from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Dawson H. Fisher, a well known capitalist of Chanute, claims no distinction as an old resident of that city nor as a pioneer of the state, but during a business career of a comparatively short period he has made a record for accomplishment that places him in the foremost rank of the prominent business men of the commonwealth. Therefore, as it is accomplishment and not time which counts in the development of a city or state, Mr. Fisher well deserves recognition as one of those representative citizens who have helped to advance the State of Kansas.

Mr. Fisher is a native of Pennsylvania, born in Beaver county, Sept. 28, 1849. He is the eldest son of John and Rachel Fisher, who were farmer residents of Beaver county. When the storm of Civil war broke over the country John Fisher went to the front and, in 1864, at the battle of the Wilderness, gave his life as a sacrifice to the cause of the Union. His death deprived his wife and a large family of small children of a husband's and father's support and provident care. Dawson H. Fisher was then a lad of fifteen, and as the eldest of the family it thus early devolved upon him to assist in its support. He was strong and active, both in intellect and body, however, and possessed not only a clear and courageous mind, but also an honest heart and a spirit of unusual energy. Plain living and toilsome work were interspersed with lessons at school, and despite these seeming hardships and disadvantages he secured a liberal education. The modest circumstances of the family proved an impetus and inspiration to the youth rather than an injury. In 1880 the family removed to Spartansburg, Pa., where Mr. Fisher married Miss Jessie Tyler, in 1881. Mr. and Mrs. Fisher remained residents of Spartansburg until 1893, when they came to Kansas and located at Chanute. There Mr. Fisher became proprietor of the Oriental Hotel, the largest hotel in the city, but at that time almost without patronage. He had had no previous experience in that line of business. Social and genial by nature and possessed of splendid business ability, he proved an ideal host and soon transformed the hotel into a popular resort for the traveling public. The discovery of oil and natural gas in that vicinity at about that time, with its attendant boom to the city, gave a new impetus to almost every line of business activity and largely increased the patronage of the Oriental Hotel. That line of endeavor engaged the attention of Mr. Fisher until 1907, when he retired from the hotel and went into the oil and natural gas business as an operator. He now owns extensive gas leases and producing wells, from which he supplies all the gas for the city of Chanute. He has been very successful throughout the whole of his business career and is today a man of wealth.

Mrs. Fisher is the daughter of T. G. Tyler, who formerly lived in Spartansburg, Pa., but removed to Chanute and died there in 1901. Mr. and Mrs. Fisher have one daughter, Miss Ceclie, who, with her parents, enjoys one of the most beautiful homes of the state, erected in 1909, and joins her parents there in extending gracious hospitality to their many friends. Mr. Fisher is a Republican in politics and is always keenly interested in the political welfare of Chanute and of the country at large. He is an ardent worker in behalf of his party in local political affairs. He is a member of the Chanute Board of Trade, and fraternally is a charter member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks in Chanute.

Pages 273-274 from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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