Transcribed from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Fraser, John, was born in Cromarty, Scotland, about 1823. He received his education at the University of Aberdeen and while there won the Huttonian prize in mathematics, offered every ten years. He also excelled in classical studies and showed an extreme earnestness and devotion to intellectual pursuits. After graduating at Aberdeen he went to the Bermuda islands to teach in Hamilton Institute. He spent several years in Bermuda, but failing health influenced him to go to New York, where he was appointed principal of a private school. In 1850 he went to Connellsville, Pa., as tutor to two boys, and while there organized a private school. In 1855 he went to Jefferson College as professor of mathematics. He remained at Jefferson for seven years, during which period he raised money for the first telescope used in a western Pennsylvania institution and superintended the erection of an observatory. In 1862 he enlisted as a private at Canonsburg and fought for the North throughout the Civil war. He won the rank of captain of the One Hundred and Fortieth Pennsylvania volunteers in Aug., 1862; became lieutenant-colonel in September, and in July of the next year was made colonel. "During the charge of Hancock at Spottsylvania he was wounded by a shell, and in Sept., 1864, he was captured and held prisoner at Libby prison, Richmond, Va.; Roper's hospital, Charlestown, S. C., and finally at Camp Sorghum, Columbia, S. C. While imprisoned with many others, at Roper's hospital, under fire of the guns from the northern fleet, he cheered his fellow prisoners for their amusement a course of lectures, notably on Shakespeare's plays." He was finally exchanged, and returning to his regiment was made brevet brigadier-general. He was mustered out in May, 1865. He then became president of the State College at Bellefontaine, Pa. On June 17, 1868, he became the second chancellor of the University of Kansas, succeeding Robert W. Oliver. The university building which bears his name was erected during his term of service, which ended in 1874. During his connection with the university he served as state superintendent of public instruction. His last position was in the Western University of Pennsylvania. He died at Allegheny, Pa., of small-pox, in June, 1878, leaving a widow but no children.

Pages 683-684 from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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