Transcribed from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Fort Titus.—During the border troubles, Col. H. T. Titus built a strong log house, about 2 miles south of Lecompton, and fortified it as a rendezvous and place of defense for pro-slavery men. After the capture and destruction of Fort Saunders (q. v.) on Aug. 15, 1856, the free-state men decided to turn their attention to Fort Titus. That night some 400 free-state partisans assembled, ready for an attack on the fort at sunrise the next morning. The assailants were divided into two parties, one under command of Capt. Samuel Walker and the other under Joe Grover. At daylight the place was surrounded, the one piece of artillery being placed in front of the house and loaded with slugs made from the type formerly belonging to the Herald of Freedom office; which had been destroyed by the pro-slavery men a short time before. As the cannon was discharged the first time the gunner remarked: "This is the second edition of the Herald of Freedom." After a short but lively engagement, the inmates of the fort surrendered. Various accounts of the casualties sustained by the contending parties at the "siege and capture of Fort Titus" have been published. Capt. Walker, who was one of the free-state commanders, and was therefore in a position to know, says they captured 400 muskets, a large number of knives and pistols, 13 horses, several wagons, a stock of provisions and 34 prisoners, and that the pro-slavery forces had 1 killed and 6 wounded, among whom was Col. Titus. William Crutchfield, a participant in the affair, gives the names of the free-state men who were wounded during the action as follows: Capt. H. J. Shombre, A. W. White, James N. Velsor, J. M. Shepherd, Charles Jordan, George Henry and George Leonard. Of these Capt. Shombre was mortally wounded, the others soon recovered. Capt. Shombre had come from Wayne county, Ind., only three weeks before with 18 young men, his company having joined Lane's party at Iowa City. Fort Titus was burned to the ground immediately after the surrender and the prisoners were taken to Lawrence, where they were "exchanged" on the 18th under a treaty made between Gov. Shannon and the free-state leaders. (See Shannon's Administration.)

Page 675 from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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