Transcribed from a supplemental volume of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed October 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM196. It is a single volume 3.


George C. Dimm, secretary and treasurer of the American Independent Telephone Company, Holton, Kans., is a native of Ohio, born in Huron county, February 7, 1855. He is a son of Thomas and Phoebe Ann (McMichael) Dimm, natives of Pennsylvania. The father was a Free Will Baptist minister, and was born near Muncie, Pa., in 1810. He came to Ohio about 1835, locating in the Western part of the State, which at that time was a dense wilderness. Here he followed farming and preaching throughout his life. He was a zealous worker in the cause of Christianity, and built a church on his own farm, and here preached the gospel to the hardy pioneers in the heart of the wilderness. He died in 1886, aged seventy-six years, and his wife survived him several years, departing this life in 1894, at the age of seventy-eight. She was a descendant of pioneer Quaker stock and Scotch-Irish extraction. Her ancestors immigrated to America during the days of William Penn, and were among the founders of Quakertown, Pa. Her grandfather Thomas McCartney built the first grist mill on the Susquehanna river in Pennsylvania. George C. Dimm spent his early boyhood days on the home farm in Huron county, Ohio, and being next to the youngest of a family of twelve children, received some educational advantages denied to the older members of his family, as school facilities gradually improved as the family grew up. He attended the district schools until he was seventeen years old, when he attended high school at Norwalk, Ohio, for a year. After teaching for a time, he attended college at Hillsdale, Mich., for three years, and when twenty-one years of age began reading law in the office of Col. J. H. Rhodes at Clyde, Ohio. After being thus employed two years he accepted the principalship of one of the ward schools at Tiffin, Ohio, where he remained one year, at the same time, continuing his study of law under the preceptorship of Judge Pillars of Tiffin. In the fall of 1879, he was admitted to the bar of Ohio, and the same year came to Kansas, locating in Osborne county where he settled on a farm, and taught school in connection with farming until 1881, when he came to Jackson county. Here he located on a farm in Franklin township, and for five years was successfully engaged in farming and stock raising. He then removed to Holton and farmed leased land on the Pottawottamie Indian reservation, and, at the same time, taught school in Jackson county. Having taken an active part in local politics since coming to Jackson county, he received the Republican nomination for the office of probate judge in 1898, and was elected, and in 1900 was re-elected, serving four years. At the expiration of his term of office, he was elected secretary and treasurer of the American Independent Telephone Company, and has since very acceptably filled that position. Mr. Dimm was married September 11, 1879, to Miss Hattie Ironmonger, a native of Huron county, Ohio, born in 1855, a daughter of C. A. and Harriet (Ellis) Ironmonger, both natives of Ohio and descendants of pioneers of that State who came from New York. The father died a number of years ago, and the mother still survives. Mr. Dimm is a member of the Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons, and both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and the Eastern Star. Mrs. Dimm is an artist of local reputation, making a specialty of china painting, and has taught that art quite extensively. Mr. Dimm takes an active interest in the Republican party organization, and has frequently served as a delegate to various conventions. He is president of the Jackson County Automobile Club, and was a delegate to the State convention at Wichita, and is an enthusiastic supporter of the good roads policy.

Pages 239-240 from a supplemental volume of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed October 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM196. It is a single volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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