Transcribed from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


John Thomas Dalton.—To have accomplished so notable a work as has Mr. Dalton, in connection with the building of military posts for the National government, would prove sufficient to give precedence and reputation to any man, were this to represent the sum total of his efforts. He has, however, for some thirty years, been actively identified with the growth and development of Junction City, and has given substantial assistance to several of its enterprises and industries.

John T. Dalton is a native of England and was born in Preston, Yorkshire, April 21, 1854, son of Rev. Henry and Maria (Graves) Dalton. His father was a Methodist Episcopal clergyman who came with his family to America in 1857, locating in Dayton, Ohio. He removed to Missouri in 1870, and, in 1879 to Kansas, where he served as pastor of various churches in the Northwest Kansas Conference. His long and useful career was ended in Joplin, Mo., in 1910, when he passed away and was laid to rest in Highland cemetery beside his beloved wife, whose demise occurred in 1906. Their surviving children are: John T., who is the eldest; William H., a prominent real estate, loan and insurance agent, of Joplin, Mo., and one of the most active Prohibitionists in that state, having been the Prohibition candidate for Congress from his district in 1910; Joseph R., a successful mason contractor of Oklahoma City, Okla.; George M., a brick contractor of Oklahoma City; Alice M., the wife of George H. Crawford, of Junction City, Kan.; and the Rev. Charles B., of Berkeley, Cal.

John T. Dalton was educated in the public schools of Dayton, Ohio; subsequently became a farmer, and for a short time worked in the mines at Joplin, Mo. In 1878 he came to Junction City, Kan., where he formed, with his brother, William H., the firm of Dalton Brothers, building contractors. Their first operations were at Skiddy, a small town in Geary county. During this partnership, which lasted until 1885, the firm was successful and a reputation for uprightness and reliability was established. In 1885 the firm of Zeigler & Dalton was formed, its interested principals being, J. T. Dalton, W. H. Dalton, H. H. Ziegler, and J. C. Ziegler. Their most notable work was in the building of government army posts, their contracts having exceeded in their total any other firm. They have built, at Fort Riley, fifty buildings; at Fort Sam Houston, twenty-two; at Fort Ethan Allen, sixteen; at Fort Leavenworth, fourteen; and one each at Fort Thomas and Fort Madison; an exceedingly creditable showing. The Geary county court-house, the Junction City opera house and the high school building were also erected by them, as well as several business buildings and residences. W. H. Dalton retired from the firm in 1892, H. H. Ziegler in 1906, and J. C. Zeigler in 1909. With the retirement of J. C. Ziegler the firm of J. T. Dalton & Sons was formed, Arthur H. and Roy T. Dalton, sons of John T., being admitted to partnership. This firm completed, in 1910, the handsome home of the Central National Bank, one of the most complete and modern banking offices in the state. Their first contract was for nine buildings at Fort D. A. Russell. Mr. Dalton was one of the most active promoters of the Junction City Electric Railway, Light & Ice Company, and became vice-president and later president. On its reorganization as the Union Light & Power Company he was elected president, and has been continued in that capacity. The interurban railway, operated by this company, connects Fort Riley with Junction City, and has been an aid of great value to the latter in a commercial way, and a profitable enterprise to its owners. He is also a stockholder in the Dewey Portland Cement Company, and a large owner of improved business property in Junction City. Mr. Dalton is a Republican and was a candidate for the lower house in the legislature in the primary election of 1910. He was unable to make a campaign, being compelled to undergo a surgical operation at that time, and failed to secure the nomination. He is a member of the Junction City Commercial Club and the Country Club, and his fraternal associations are as a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.

Mr. Dalton married, April 6, 1881, Miss Elizabeth Rust, daughter of John E. Rust, of Joplin, Mo. To them have been born six children, two of whom—William R. and Mary Elizabeth—died in childhood. Arthur H., born Jan. 6, 1882, a graduate of the Junction City High School, completed a course at Baker University, Baldwin, Kan., and is a member of the firm of J. T. Dalton & Sons. He is a member of the Junction City Commercial Club, Union Lodge, No. 7, Free and Accepted Masons, Junction City Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He was married June 8, 1900, to Miss Anna M. Blake of Momence, Ill. Roy T., born Oct. 7, 1883, is a graduate of the Junction City High School, and also completed a course in the Sedalia (Mo.) Business College. He is a member of the firm of J. T. Dalton & Sons, the Junction City Commercial Club, and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He married, Oct. 3, 1907, Miss Lillian Schlatter, of Junction City. George E., born March 29, 1889, is a graduate of the Junction City High School, and is now a student in Baker University, Baldwin, Kan. John W., born Dec. 24, 1895, is a student. Mr. Dalton is in all respects a high type of the conservative, unassuming American, diligent in his various duties and commercial affairs and conscientious in all things. His position today is the result of his own well directed efforts. His methods have been clean, capable and honest. He has realized a large and substantial success in the business world, but of even greater consequence to him is his possession of a well earned popularity and the esteem which comes from honorable living.

Pages 814-816 from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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