Transcribed from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Marcus Andrew Crouse, who for almost a quarter of a century was intimately connected with the banking and financial interests of Burlington, and who was recognized as one of Coffey county's most progressive and enterprising citizens, was a native of the Buckeye State, having been born at Circleville, Ohio, Nov. 15, 1845. In the public schools of his native city he acquired a good, practical education, and at the age of nineteen years he began his business career as collection clerk in the First National Bank of Circleville, but remained in that position for a short time only, resigning to enter the Union army, and until the close of the war he served in the quartermaster's department at Chattanooga, Tenn., under Capt. A. R. Kellar. When the war ended he returned to Circleville and became bookkeeper for a wholesale grocery concern. Here he continued until in February, 1870, when he removed to Kansas, locating at Garnett, Anderson county, where he engaged in business as the junior member of the firm of Wittich & Crouse, general merchants, and during the twelve years that he continued in this line of activity he laid the foundation of his fortune. In 1883 he removed to Kansas City, Mo., where he became a member of the private banking firm of Foster, Crouse & Co. The following year this house closed up its affairs in Kansas City, Crouse and Foster going to Burlington, where they founded the People's National Bank, of which Mr. Crouse was made vice-president. In January, 1893, he was elected to the presidency of the bank and held that office until his death, which occurred on April 27, 1908, and was due to apoplexy.

In 1870 Mr. Crouse was united in marriage at Garnett with Miss Mary L. Bailey, who was born in Ohio in 1846. Her father, Henry Bailey, was a native of Philadelphia, Pa., but went to Ohio while still a young man and established himself in business as a boot and shoe merchant. In 1869 he removed to Kansas, settled at Garnett and engaged in agricultural pursuits. Some years later he went to Oklahoma City, where he died in 1907. He served in the state militia, was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and was in every respect a model citizen. Mrs. Crouse was educated in the Western Female Seminary at Oxford, Ohio, and is a refined and cultured lady. She has large interests, chiefly in Kansas City, where she owns a number of pieces of valuable rental property, but her worldly prosperity has not rendered her proud nor haughty, and for every one she has a kind word of encouragement.

The success of Marcus A. Crouse was due to the fact that he cultivated thoroughly his talent for business, never undertook anything until he had carefully examined it from all sides, and he gave close attention to the little details that in the end bring satisfactory results. Added to this, he was a man of great energy and determination, and when he once launched any enterprise he never thought of turning back. He was an optimist, and in the darkest hours his hope buoyed him up and spurred him on to greater achievements. In his relations with his fellowmen he was never known to turn down a friend, and especially was he inclined to lend a hand to worthy young men who were just beginning the battle of life. Although an ardent Republican in his political belief and a friend to good government, taking a commendable interest in the progress of civic institutions, he was never an aspirant for public office, preferring the certain returns from a well managed business to the precarious emoluments of a political career. His domestic life was ideal, and his death leaves a vacancy in the home and heart of his widow that can never be filled, while Coffey county has lost one of her most upright and honored men.

Pages 1033-1034 from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

gold bar

VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


Background and KSGenWeb logo were designed and are copyrighted by
Tom & Carolyn Ward
for the limited use of the KSGenWeb Project.
Permission is granted for use only on an official KSGenWeb page.


©2002 by Tom & Carolyn Ward

Skyways Button
Home Page for Kansas
Search all of Blue Skyways
including
The KSGenWeb Project
KSGenWeb logo