Transcribed from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Samuel T. Cantrell.—From the operator of the keys of the telegraph instrument to division superintendent of the St. Louis & San Franciso railway system is the brief epitome of the career of Mr. Cantrell, a young man and, furthermore, a native Kansan. In our country the horizon of every man's achievements is fixed by his own capabilities and the degree to which he possesses the quality of industry. Mr. Cantrell started life absolutely at the bottom of the ladder, and the rungs by which he has climbed to success and prominence were work, energy, integrity, and merit.

Mr. Cantrell was born on a farm near Fredonia, Kan., Jan. 12, 1876. His father was Miles T. Cantrell and his mother was Isabelle Martin prior to her marriage. Miles T. Cantrell was a native of Illinois and a man of good education, having been a teacher a number of years. In 1870 he removed from Illinois to a farm near Fredonia, Kan., where for ten years he gave his attention to agriculture; then, in 1880, he engaged in the mercantile business at Fredonia and was also postmaster there a number of years, having been a Republican appointee. He was a veteran of the Civil war, and both he and his wife were devout and active members of the Methodist Episcopal church, to the work of which they devoted a great deal of their time. The father passed away at Fredonia in 1907 and the mother in 1905.

Mr. Cantrell was educated in the schools of Fredonia and his first employment was in the store of his father, where he evinced the same spirit of industry that has marked his subsequent career. Later he learned telegraphy, and after one year's service as a relief agent was given a regular position at Oronogo, Mo., on the St. Louis & San Francisco line. After being transferred to different towns as agent he was made trainmaster at Fort Scott, on the northern division of that road, in 1906. He next became an assistant division superintendent, but his ability and merit soon won further recognition and, in 1909, he was made division superintendent of the St. Louis & San Francisco railroad, his present position, his territory being Kansas division. He is devoted to his work and familiar with the details of every question that arises. He maintains personally the closest supervision of the affairs of his division, and by his own industry has furnished an example which has impressed itself upon the whole service. Thoroughness is the secret of Mr. Cantrell's success.

In 1898 Mr. Cantrell was united in marriage to Miss Nita Earnest of Webb City, Mo. Three daughters have been born of this union: Helen, Ruth and Alice, of whom only Helen is as yet (1911) of school age. Mrs. Cantrell is a member of the Christian church. Fraternally Mr. Cantrell is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. In politics he is a Republican.

This young man, at the age of thirty-six, has already made a record. His accomplishments speak more eloquently than words of the ability, energy and conscientious endeavor he has devoted to the interests of his employers, and they in turn have recognized his merit and have rewarded it. A man of sterling worth and a courteous gentleman, Kansas is proud to recognize him among its representative citizens, for such are the men who have made it the great state it is.

Pages 556-557 from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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