Transcribed from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Daniel F. Campbell, one of the leading attorneys of the Fort Scott bar, who has represented his district in the state legislature, was born near Ann Arbor, Washtenaw county, Michigan, Oct. 15, 1864, the third child in a family of six. His parents were Andrew and Katherine Campbell. His mother was born in New York State, and his father was born near Glasgow, Scotland, in 1831. The family immigrated to the United States in 1838, settled on government land between Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti, Mich., and have continued to live there to the present time. Mr. Campbell is a strong Republican, was once elected lieutenant-governor of Michigan and has been Grand Master of the State Grange for two terms. He placed Gov. Cyrus G. Luce's name before the convention which nominated the latter for governor the first time and has been a leader in local politics in his county. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell have celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. Daniel F. Campbell attended the district school near his home, graduated in the high school at Ann Arbor in 1884, and in the law department of the University of Michigan in 1887. In the fall of 1888 he came to Fort Scott, Kan., and on Dec. 1, formed a partnership with A. M. Keene, under the firm name of Keene & Campbell, which continued three years. Mr. Campbell then practiced alone for a time and then became a partner of Judge J. S. West for six months. Since 1893 he has continued his professional work independently. Mr. Campbell has always been an active worker in the ranks of the Republican party and was its nominee for the state legislature in 1898 and 1902, being elected by a good majority each time. While a member of the House he introduced fifteen bills, thirteen of which became laws. He was the originator of the good roads law for Bourbon county. This bill was passed during his first term; was repealed by the next session of the legislature, but Mr. Campbell again introduced the same bill during his second term and it was passed. This law provided for the building of stone roads north, east, south and west from the county seat, Fort Scott, to the boundaries of the county. The tax for construction was not to exceed two mills and the county commissioner and the mayor of Fort Scott were to oversee the building of the roads. Mr. Campbell introduced a bill revising the code of all first class cities; one to compel manufacturers to furnish protection to machinery and make owners liable for injury to or loss of life of employes, and one making it possible for schools to loan unexpended money, thereby earning them $35,000 a year in interest. All these measures are now among the laws of Kansas. While in the legislature Mr. Campbell served on the following committees: Rules, of which he was chairman; cities of the first class, judiciary, revision, and railroads. In 1903 he was appointed attorney to adjust town site claims among the Indians in Oklahoma Territory, which kept him there about a year. Mr. Campbell's practice is general and he is also engaged in real estate transactions quite extensively. He is regarded as one of the leading and progressive citizens of Bourbon county and Fort Scott. On Feb. 19, 1891, Mr. Campbell was united in marriage with Adella Adams, of Ypsilanti, Mich., a descendant of President Adams. Five children have been born to them—twins, who died in infancy; Andrew Parkhurst, born Feb. 19, 1894; Katherine, born Dec. 2, 1897; and John Adams, born June 12, 1903. Mr. and Mrs Campbell are members of the Congregational church, in which Mr. Campbell was superintendent of the Sunday school ten years. He also is a member of the Redmen, the Woodmen of the World, and the Fraternal Life Association.

Pages 338-339 from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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