Transcribed from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Committee of Safety.—The Committee of Safety was called into existence by the same chain of circumstances that inaugurated the Wakarusa war. Shortly after the capture and rescue of Jacob Branson the border ruffians began to menace Lawrence, and the people of that city held a meeting on Nov. 27, 1855, to consider what was the best course to pursue. As a means of preventing an attack by the pro-slavery forces, some suggested that all who had taken part in the rescue of Branson should be compelled to leave the town, and a partial order to that effect was issued. George P. Lowery moved that a committee of ten citizens be appointed "to provide for the protection of the town against any armed force," and upon the adoption of the motion Mr. Lowrey was made chairman of the committee. His associates were G. W. Hutchingson, Charles Robinson, George W. Deitzler, C. W. Babcock, George W. Brown, Robert Morrow, Josiah Miller, A. H. Mallory and J. S. Emery.

Holloway says: "it was the express understanding that this committee was to provide, not for the purpose of aggression nor to shield any person from deserved punishment, but to protect the town against armed invaders then assembled around Lawrence."

One of the first acts of the committee was to appoint Charles Robinson commander-in-chief of all forces raised for the defense of the city, and Col. James H. Lane was made second in command. As commander and vice-commander, Robinson and Lane signed the treaty of peace with Gov. Shannon on Dec. 8, 1855. (See Shannon's Administration.) Although that treaty ended the immediate danger, the committee did not at once disband, but continued to act in an advisory capacity for some time, holding itself in readiness to exercise the authority originally conferred upon it should occasion require.

Pages 394-395 from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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