Transcribed from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Church of God and Saints of Christ.—This religions organization among the colored people was started by William S. Crowdy, a negro, who in 1896 claimed to have had a vision from God, calling him to lead his people to the true religion, at the same time giving him prophetic endowment. He at once began to preach in Kansas and soon organized the Church of God and Saints of Christ at Lawrence. Only a few persons joined him for some time, but the numbers gradually increased and the headquarters were established at Philadelphia. Crowdy was appointed bishop of the new body and two white men who were associated with him in the work were subsequently apponited[sic] to the same office.

Believing that the negro race is descended from the lost tribes of Israel, Crowdy taught that the Ten Commandments and a literal adherence to the teachings of the Bible, including both the Old and New Testament, are the positive guides for the salvation of man. In order to make no mistakes in the commandments, a pamphlet has been published under the direction of the church, called the Seven Keys, which gives references and authority for the various customs and orders of the church. Members are admitted to the church upon repentance of sin and baptism by immersion. The Lord's Supper, the washing of feet and the pledge of the holy kiss are observed.

The central organization of the church is an executive board or council called a presbytery, which is made up of 12 ordained elders and evangelists whose duty it is to look after the general business of the church. The prophet (Crowdy) is not elected, but holds his position by virtue of a divine call. He is presiding officer of both the executive board and of the church. The followers believe that the prophet is in direct communication with God, utters prophecies and performs miracles by his will. The district assemblies are composed of the different orders of the ministry and delegates from each local church. The ministers hold office during good behavior. The temporal affairs of the churches are looked after by deacons under the general supervision of the assemblies. Since the founding of the church in Kansas it has had a somewhat rapid growth and in 1906 had 48 organizations, located in fourteen states and the District of Columbia, the total number of communicants in the United States being 1,823. In Kansas there are 3 organizations with a membership of 78.

Pages 345-346 from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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