Transcribed from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Cemeteries, National.—There are three national cemeteries in Kansas—one at Fort Leavenworth, one at Fort Scott, and one at Baxter Springs. The one at Fort Leavenworth was established in 1861, and contains an area of 15 acres, inclosed by a stone wall. It is a portion of the government reservation, which is a magnificent natural park. It is beautifully located half a mile west of the garrison, which is approached by way of a broad macadamized roadway that connects the city of Leavenworth with the fort. The view of the government reservation from the cemetery is imposing and picturesque. Water for the cemetery is supplied by cisterns and the post waterworks, and there is fine surface and underground drainage. The lodge is a six-room stone building, with a brick out-building, and there is a rectangular rostrum. The interments in the Fort Leavenworth cemetery number 3,174, of which 1,729 are known and 1,445 are unknown.

The cemetery at Fort Scott is located about one and a half miles from the heart of the city. The grounds were established as a cemetery by the government on Nov. 15, 1862, with an area of 10.26 acres, inclosed by a stone wall. The cemetery is rectangular in shape, 924 feet long, extending east and west, and 478 wide, north and south. A part of the ground was donated by the city, a part by the Presbyterian church, and the rest was purcahsed by the government, for $75. Through the stone wall mentioned are entrances at either end of the cemetery made by means of iron folding gates swinging from stone pillars. The surface of the ground is a graceful slope. The crest of the slope is at the east end and for a short distance the descent is extremely light, but soon becomes of greater fall, extending about half the length of the grounds, and again becomes more mild reaching to the other extremity of the place. The main entrance is in the center of the west wall at the foot of the grade. A wide driveway passes up the gentle slope to the center of the cemetery, and at about half the length of the grounds divides, branching to either side around the more abrupt slope to the summit, enclosing a heart-shaped plat, tastefully ornamented with shade trees. At regular intervals upon the margins of this plat four mounted cannon are stationed to guard, as it were, these holy and sacred precincts. Immediately upon the brow of the crest, at about equal angular distances from the superintendent's residence building and rostrum, rising out of a large, grass covered mound, is the tall flag staff, upon the summit of which the national emblem mournfully keeps untiring watch over the resting place of its defenders. At the other end of the cemetery and about half its length, separated by the central driveway and surrounded by a driveway on the remaining three sides, are the two rectangular plats or panels occupied by the interments. These plats of equal size are of even and moderate grade. Here, side by side, in rank and file, like as in solid phalanx they marched, the veterans lie buried. The surface of these plats is smooth and even, with no perceptible marks of the graves except the little block of marble standing at the head of each. The entire grounds, excepting the drives, is covered with a blue grass sod, and the whole is underdrained with tiling, by which the surface is always kept dry. The enclosure is also adorned with a profusion of artistically arranged shade trees, and the burying plats are embellished with numerous evergreens, through whose dark green foliage may be seen the ghostlike whiteness of the marble blocks, giving the whole a weird and mournful appearance. There are 666 interments in the cemetery, 177 of whom are unknown. At different places among the graves are stanzas of poetry appropriate to the place, printed in enduring letters on tablets. The cemetery is reached from the city by a fine macadamized drive, alongside of which is a walk, and on either side of both a row of shade trees. This improvement was made during the year 1882 at a cost of about 18,000. Upon the summit of the grade, at the east end of the grounds and near one corner, is the tasty, two-story brick residence of the superintendent, and back of this building in the corner are the stable and out-houses. (See Baxter Springs.)

Pages 304-305 from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

gold bar

VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


Background and KSGenWeb logo were designed and are copyrighted by
Tom & Carolyn Ward
for the limited use of the KSGenWeb Project.
Permission is granted for use only on an official KSGenWeb page.


©2002 by Tom & Carolyn Ward

Skyways Button
Home Page for Kansas
Search all of Blue Skyways
including
The KSGenWeb Project
KSGenWeb logo