Transcribed from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Bankers' Association.—The Kansas Bankers' Association was organized on Feb. 22, 1887, at Topeka, with 60 members. The purpose of the organization is set forth in the preamble of the constitution a summary of which is as follows: To promote the general interest of the commonwealth of Kansas; the usefulness of the banks and the financial institutions of the state; the cultivation of acquaintanceship among the bankers; and through the medium of periodical conventions to bring about the full and free discussion of questions pertaining to the financial and commercial interests of the country; to consider matters of legislation of interest to both state and national banks and to preserve and disseminate information of interest to its members and to the general public. Following out the lines thus laid down in the constitution, the association has held annual conventions in various cities of Kansas. From the original membership of 60 it has grown to be an organization having a membership on May 1, 1911, of between 900 and 1,000.

The proceedings of the association have been published each year, and their contents constitute a valuable contribution to the financial literature of the country, as the papers presented at the conventions have been prepared by the ablest financiers of the state. Another feature which has made the association of great value to the state has been its zeal in safeguarding legislation. As students of financial questions, the counsels of the bankers of Kansas, through the association, have been of great value in framing legislation and assisting in the deliberations of the legislature upon the same. As a result, much that is valuable in the body of commercial laws of Kansas, has either originated with the association or is due to the support given it by the bankers. The third feature, and one fully as important as the others, is that which has for its object the apprehension and conviction of criminals. By a system of rewards, and other means, professional criminals have been overtaken in their career of crime, sentenced and imprisoned. Through warning notices by circular, telephone or telegraph, banks are advised of the operations of crooks and swindlers; descriptions are given of the person or criminal, if known, and of his methods of operating. A vast amount of correspondence is carried on by the association in search of the whereabouts of criminals in order to prevent bank robberies.

The association has established within itself an insurance department, which has a twofold object: First, to supply the banks of the state high class burglary insurance, fidelity and depository bonds; second, the association acting as agent for responsible insurance companies should itself earn the commissions usually paid to state agencies and thus create a fund out of such commission earnings to be used for the association. The association now has an aggregate value of about $10,000,000 of business which it has placed for the banks of Kansas and on which commissions are earned sufficient to discharge about one-half of the entire expense of operating the association, including the rewards and expenses incident to the apprehension and conviction of criminals.

The permanent offices of the association are maintained at Topeka. In Feb., 1911, the association began the publication of a periodical known as The Kansas Banker, which has for its object the exploiting of distinct association enterprises and keeping all bankers in touch with its interests.

The membership consists of both state and national banks, about an equal number of state and national bankers having presided over the twenty-four annual conventions which the association has held since its organization, these having been chosen alternately from the northern and southern portions of the state.

In government the association is democratic, all authority being vested in the entire membership seated in convention. This body has created an executive council which meets regularly at stated times and convenes in special session when occasion requires, administering the affairs of the association between conventions. This council consists of the president, vice-president, all ex-presidents of the association and the chairmen of the groups. This retaining of the ex-presidents as permanent members of the council preserves for the association the wisdom and experience of its most able men.

Pages 135-136 from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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