Transcribed from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.


Roy D. Armstrong, of Scott, county attorney of Scott county and one of the leading members of the Scott county bar, is a native Kansan and one of the progressive young men. of the state. He was born Jan. 21, 1879, on a farm in Shawnee county, a son of Daniel D. and Ruth I. (Curtis) Armstrong. Daniel D. Armstrong was a native of New York State, where he was born in 1829, to parents that were natives of Scotland and Canada. He was a cabinet maker and a farmer and became a resident of Kansas in 1865. He located at Topeka, where he was employed by the Union Pacific Railway Company in the construction of its road as far west as Hays, Ellis county. After he quit railroad work he bought sixteen acres of land on the old Kaw Indian reservation, which now is the Armstrong addition of North Topeka, and was platted into town lots in 1890. His brother, John Armstrong, late of Topeka, was a member of the original town site company of Topeka, and appeared in the historical pageant at Topeka during the state fair of 1911, celebrating the semi-centennial anniversary of the statehood of Kansas, as the only survivor of the original town site company that founded the capital city. John Armstrong came to Topeka in 1854 and was active during the Civil war in favor of slavery. Daniel D. Armstrong, the father of Roy D., took an active part in the upbuilding of North Topeka until 1895, when he removed to La Crosse, Kan., and retired from active business. He died July 22, 1898. In political views he was a Democrat and though interested in the work of his party he never sought official preferment. In 1867 he was united in marriage to Miss Ruth I. Curtis, the daughter of William and Permelia (Hubbard) Curtis, to whom she was born in 1843, in Vermilion county, Indiana. She now resides in Topeka with her son, E. T. Armstrong; she is an aunt of Charles Curtis, United States senator from Kansas. The union of Daniel D. and Ruth I. Armstrong was blessed with four children, viz.: Sarah Permelia, born in 1868, who died in 1878; Charles W., born Feb. 2, 1873, who now resides in Topeka; Roy D., the subject of this review, who was third in order of birth; and Edward T., born March 16, 1881, who is now a jeweler at Topeka.

Roy D. Armstrong attended the public schools of Topeka and completed his education at La Crosse. In 1895 he began the study of law and pursued his studies with such vigor that he was admitted to the bar in 1898, when not yet twenty years of age. On April 4, 1904, he was admitted to practice also in the supreme court of the state. In 1899 he opened a law office at Scott, Scott county, where he has since been very actively engaged in professional duties, and in 1910 was elected county attorney of Scott county. He is a young man of good business discernment as well as of legal ability and has very successfully speculated in land so that he has already won financial success. He is loyally devoted to the interests of his adopted city and as president of the Scott Industrial Club has lent his energy and influence to every movement for its upbuilding. Politically he is a Democrat, and fraternally he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.

On Sept. 6, 1910, Mr. Armstrong married Miss Loretta M. Harrington, a daughter of George W. Harrington, a retired manufacturer of Superior, Neb. Mrs. Armstrong was born June 20, 1882, in Nebraska, and is a graduate of the Superior, Neb., High School.

Pages 1580-1581 from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z


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