Transcribed from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.


Aliens.—Under the Wyandotte constitution, as originally adopted and ratified by the people, aliens had the same rights and privileges in the ownership and enjoyment of real estate in Kansas as did the citizens of the state. Some years later there grew up a sentiment in opposition to aliens owning lands within the state, and in 1888 this sentiment found expression in an amendment to the constitution providing that the rights of aliens with regard to ownership of real property in Kansas might be regulated by law. The legislature, however, took no action on the subject until the act of March 6, 1891, the principal provision of which was as follows:

"Non resident aliens, firms of aliens, or corporations incorporated under the laws of any foreign country, shall not be capable of acquiring title to or taking or holding any lands or real estate in this state by descent, device, purchase or otherwise, except that the heirs of aliens who have heretofore acquired lands in this state under the laws thereof, and the heirs of aliens who may acquire lands under the provisions of this act, may take such lands by device or descent, and hold the same for the space of three years, and no longer, if such alien at the time of so acquiring such lands is of the age of twenty-one years; and if not twenty-one years of age, then for the term of five years from the time of so acquiring such lands; and if, at the end of the time herein limited, such lands so acquired by such alien heirs have not been sold to bona fide purchasers for value, or such alien heirs have not become actual residents of this state, the same shall revert and escheat to the State of Kansas," etc.

Coal, lead and zinc lands were exempted from the provisions of the act, and there were some other provisions to secure the application of the law without working unnecessary hardships upon any one. The law was subsequently held to be constitutional by the supreme court of the state.

Page 59 from volume I of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. ... / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed May 2002 by Carolyn Ward.

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VOLUME I

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
INTRODUCTION

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I

VOLUME II

TITLE PAGE / LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

J | K | L | Mc | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

VOLUME III

BIOGRAPHICAL INDEXES


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